"plain text" vs. "running text"

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"plain text" vs. "running text"

Peter Saint-Andre-2
<hat type='individual'/>

In several places 3987bis uses "plain text" where I think it means
"running text"...

      Delimiters "<" (U+003C), ">" (U+003E), and '"' (U+0022): Appendix
      C of [RFC3986] suggests the use of double-quotes
      ("http://example.com/") and angle brackets (<http://example.com/>)
      as delimiters for URIs in plain text.

      Many applications (for example, mail user agents) try to detect
      URIs appearing in plain text.

The same might be true of this sentence:

      Tags (U+E0000-E0FFF): These characters provide a way to language
      tag in Unicode plain text.

Peter

--
Peter Saint-Andre
https://stpeter.im/




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Re: "plain text" vs. "running text"

Bjoern Hoehrmann
* Peter Saint-Andre wrote:

><hat type='individual'/>
>
>In several places 3987bis uses "plain text" where I think it means
>"running text"...
>
>      Delimiters "<" (U+003C), ">" (U+003E), and '"' (U+0022): Appendix
>      C of [RFC3986] suggests the use of double-quotes
>      ("http://example.com/") and angle brackets (<http://example.com/>)
>      as delimiters for URIs in plain text.
>
>      Many applications (for example, mail user agents) try to detect
>      URIs appearing in plain text.

This is plain text as opposed to marked up text. "Running text" would
usually exclude things like footnotes, but in something like a mail,

  The foo draft [1] contradicts the bar draft [2].

  [1] <http://www.example.org/example-org-drafts/
      foo>
  [2] <http://www.example.org/example-org-drafts/
      bar>

would have the addresses in footnotes, not running text, even though
the thing as a whole is plain text when using Content-Type: text/plain.
--
Björn Höhrmann · mailto:[hidden email] · http://bjoern.hoehrmann.de
Am Badedeich 7 · Telefon: +49(0)160/4415681 · http://www.bjoernsworld.de
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Re: "plain text" vs. "running text"

Peter Saint-Andre-2
On 6/7/12 1:51 PM, Bjoern Hoehrmann wrote:

> * Peter Saint-Andre wrote:
>> <hat type='individual'/>
>>
>> In several places 3987bis uses "plain text" where I think it means
>> "running text"...
>>
>>      Delimiters "<" (U+003C), ">" (U+003E), and '"' (U+0022): Appendix
>>      C of [RFC3986] suggests the use of double-quotes
>>      ("http://example.com/") and angle brackets (<http://example.com/>)
>>      as delimiters for URIs in plain text.
>>
>>      Many applications (for example, mail user agents) try to detect
>>      URIs appearing in plain text.
>
> This is plain text as opposed to marked up text.

Right, that's how 3987bis defines it:

   running text:  Human text (paragraphs, sentences, phrases) with
      syntax according to orthographic conventions of a natural
      language, as opposed to syntax defined for ease of processing by
      machines (e.g., markup, programming languages).

I'm suggesting only that we be consistent about our terminology.

Peter

--
Peter Saint-Andre
https://stpeter.im/





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Re: "plain text" vs. "running text"

John C Klensin
In reply to this post by Peter Saint-Andre-2
Peter,

--On Thursday, June 07, 2012 13:35 -0600 Peter Saint-Andre
<[hidden email]> wrote:

> <hat type='individual'/>
>
> In several places 3987bis uses "plain text" where I think it
> means "running text"...
>
>       Delimiters "<" (U+003C), ">" (U+003E), and '"' (U+0022):
> Appendix       C of [RFC3986] suggests the use of double-quotes
>       ("http://example.com/") and angle brackets
> (<http://example.com/>)       as delimiters for URIs in plain
> text.
>
>       Many applications (for example, mail user agents) try to
> detect       URIs appearing in plain text.
>
> The same might be true of this sentence:
>
>       Tags (U+E0000-E0FFF): These characters provide a way to
> language       tag in Unicode plain text.


I'm not as sure about the second case ("Unicode plain text" may
be specifically meaningful although, if that were the intent,
I'd prefer "plain Unicode text" for clarity).  But the first
case definitely look to me like a situation in which "plain
text" could be a term of art referring to a particular media
type, and hence where "running text" is definitely more clear as
well as more accurate.

   john


>
> Peter