math: URI scheme and protocol handler

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math: URI scheme and protocol handler

Gerardo Capiel
Hi,
I'm proposing the creation of a W3C Community Group to discuss a math: URI scheme and Web browser protocol handler. The 'math' URI scheme and protocol handler can be used by Web browsers and other applications to transport mathematical expressions to other applications, such as Assistive Technologies or graphing calculators.  If you are interested this proposal, please join: http://www.w3.org/community/groups/proposed/#mathprotocol.  Below is the provisional URI Scheme Registration Template:
   URI scheme name
      math - The math: URI scheme can be used by Web browsers and other applications to transport mathematical expressions to other applications, such as Assistive Technologies or graphing calculators.

   Status
      Provisional
x
   URI scheme syntax
      Applications launched via the math protocol take as a parameter either a URL to a resource containing a mathematical expression in MathML or other formats or the actual math expression in uncompressed or compressed form. For example:
      <a href="math://mathmlcloud.org/m/uniqueexpressionid">math://mathmlcloud.org/m/uniqueexpressionid
      math:<math><mi>x</mi><mo>+</mo><mn>2</mn></math>
      math:<math-compressed>someexpressionincompressedformat</math-compressed>

   URI scheme semantics
      TBD
      
   Encoding considerations
      TBD
      
   Applications/protocols that use this URI scheme name
      Applications should register the math: protocol handler with this scheme.
      
   Interoperability considerations
      TBD
      
   Security considerations
      None known.
      
   Contact
      Gerardo Capiel, [hidden email]
      
   Author/Change controller
      Gerardo Capiel, [hidden email]
      
   References
      [1] http://www.w3.org/community/groups/proposed/#mathprotocol
      [2] <a href="https://wiki.benetech.org/display/MATH/Protocol&#43;Handlers&#43;for&#43;External&#43;Applications&#43;to&#43;Process&#43;MathML">https://wiki.benetech.org/display/MATH/Protocol+Handlers+for+External+Applications+to+Process+MathML
      

Gerardo Capiel
VP of Engineering
benetech

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Re: math: URI scheme and protocol handler

Paul Prescod-3

Please clarify the requirements. Math expressions can already be expressed in a hypothetical markup language like this.

<math-expression  href="http://...."/>

Or:

<math-expression href="data:..."/>

The role of the URI scheme is not to convey the semantics or data type of the resource but rather to supply information on the network location of the resource.

So I am skeptical that this URI scheme is needed. If we went down this path then we would need a URI scheme for images, zip files, documents, movies and so forth.

On Apr 26, 2014 11:28 PM, "Gerardo Capiel" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi,
I'm proposing the creation of a W3C Community Group to discuss a math: URI scheme and Web browser protocol handler. The 'math' URI scheme and protocol handler can be used by Web browsers and other applications to transport mathematical expressions to other applications, such as Assistive Technologies or graphing calculators.  If you are interested this proposal, please join: http://www.w3.org/community/groups/proposed/#mathprotocol.  Below is the provisional URI Scheme Registration Template:
   URI scheme name
      math - The math: URI scheme can be used by Web browsers and other applications to transport mathematical expressions to other applications, such as Assistive Technologies or graphing calculators.

   Status
      Provisional
x
   URI scheme syntax
      Applications launched via the math protocol take as a parameter either a URL to a resource containing a mathematical expression in MathML or other formats or the actual math expression in uncompressed or compressed form. For example:
      math://mathmlcloud.org/m/uniqueexpressionid
      math:<math><mi>x</mi><mo>+</mo><mn>2</mn></math>
      math:<math-compressed>someexpressionincompressedformat</math-compressed>

   URI scheme semantics
      TBD
      
   Encoding considerations
      TBD
      
   Applications/protocols that use this URI scheme name
      Applications should register the math: protocol handler with this scheme.
      
   Interoperability considerations
      TBD
      
   Security considerations
      None known.
      
   Contact
      Gerardo Capiel, [hidden email]
      
   Author/Change controller
      Gerardo Capiel, [hidden email]
      
   References
      [1] http://www.w3.org/community/groups/proposed/#mathprotocol
      [2] https://wiki.benetech.org/display/MATH/Protocol+Handlers+for+External+Applications+to+Process+MathML
      

Gerardo Capiel
VP of Engineering
benetech

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Re: math: URI scheme and protocol handler

Gerardo Capiel
Paul,

Thank you for your questions. The use case is very similar to the mailto URI scheme and protocol handler. We desire a mechanism to launch from a Web browser an application to handle a mathematical expression. 

This idea was prompted by the need for an alternative approach to enable Assistive Technology applications to provide blind students navigation of complex mathematical expressions via Text-To-Speech. The current approach by the leading solution provider, Design Science, is to use an Internet Explorer plugin. This approach no longer works as of IE 11 due to changes in the IE security model and has not been extended to any other browsers. 

As part of my work in the DIAGRAM Center, I have discussed this math: protocol handler with Design Science and other vendors wishing to provide Assistive Technology solutions and they are very interested as it simplifies implementation, particularly across multiple browsers and operating systems.

We also realized that this idea could benefit all students, as it provides a simple mechanism for students to explore mathematical expressions on the Web in math notebooks, such as IPython, or applications such as graphing calculators or MATLAB.

You can find more details at:
<a href="https://wiki.benetech.org/display/MATH/Protocol&#43;Handlers&#43;for&#43;External&#43;Applications&#43;to&#43;Process&#43;MathML" style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);">https://wiki.benetech.org/display/MATH/Protocol+Handlers+for+External+Applications+to+Process+MathML

Let me know if this helps or you need more details.

Cheers,

Gerardo

Gerardo Capiel
VP of Engineering
Benetech

On Apr 27, 2014, at 11:49 AM, "Paul Prescod" <[hidden email]> wrote:

Please clarify the requirements. Math expressions can already be expressed in a hypothetical markup language like this.

<math-expression  href="http://...."/>

Or:

<math-expression href="data:..."/>

The role of the URI scheme is not to convey the semantics or data type of the resource but rather to supply information on the network location of the resource.

So I am skeptical that this URI scheme is needed. If we went down this path then we would need a URI scheme for images, zip files, documents, movies and so forth.

On Apr 26, 2014 11:28 PM, "Gerardo Capiel" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi,
I'm proposing the creation of a W3C Community Group to discuss a math: URI scheme and Web browser protocol handler. The 'math' URI scheme and protocol handler can be used by Web browsers and other applications to transport mathematical expressions to other applications, such as Assistive Technologies or graphing calculators.  If you are interested this proposal, please join: http://www.w3.org/community/groups/proposed/#mathprotocol.  Below is the provisional URI Scheme Registration Template:
   URI scheme name
      math - The math: URI scheme can be used by Web browsers and other applications to transport mathematical expressions to other applications, such as Assistive Technologies or graphing calculators.

   Status
      Provisional
x
   URI scheme syntax
      Applications launched via the math protocol take as a parameter either a URL to a resource containing a mathematical expression in MathML or other formats or the actual math expression in uncompressed or compressed form. For example:
      math://mathmlcloud.org/m/uniqueexpressionid
      math:<math><mi>x</mi><mo>+</mo><mn>2</mn></math>
      math:<math-compressed>someexpressionincompressedformat</math-compressed>

   URI scheme semantics
      TBD
      
   Encoding considerations
      TBD
      
   Applications/protocols that use this URI scheme name
      Applications should register the math: protocol handler with this scheme.
      
   Interoperability considerations
      TBD
      
   Security considerations
      None known.
      
   Contact
      Gerardo Capiel, [hidden email]
      
   Author/Change controller
      Gerardo Capiel, [hidden email]
      
   References
      [1] http://www.w3.org/community/groups/proposed/#mathprotocol
      [2] <a href="https://wiki.benetech.org/display/MATH/Protocol&#43;Handlers&#43;for&#43;External&#43;Applications&#43;to&#43;Process&#43;MathML" target="_blank">https://wiki.benetech.org/display/MATH/Protocol+Handlers+for+External+Applications+to+Process+MathML
      

Gerardo Capiel
VP of Engineering
benetech

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Re: math: URI scheme and protocol handler

Paul Prescod-3

Could not the browser trigger a third party tool on the basis of the content type rather than the URI scheme?  This is how zip files trigger unzip applications.

On Apr 27, 2014 11:56 AM, "Gerardo Capiel" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Paul,

Thank you for your questions. The use case is very similar to the mailto URI scheme and protocol handler. We desire a mechanism to launch from a Web browser an application to handle a mathematical expression. 

This idea was prompted by the need for an alternative approach to enable Assistive Technology applications to provide blind students navigation of complex mathematical expressions via Text-To-Speech. The current approach by the leading solution provider, Design Science, is to use an Internet Explorer plugin. This approach no longer works as of IE 11 due to changes in the IE security model and has not been extended to any other browsers. 

As part of my work in the DIAGRAM Center, I have discussed this math: protocol handler with Design Science and other vendors wishing to provide Assistive Technology solutions and they are very interested as it simplifies implementation, particularly across multiple browsers and operating systems.

We also realized that this idea could benefit all students, as it provides a simple mechanism for students to explore mathematical expressions on the Web in math notebooks, such as IPython, or applications such as graphing calculators or MATLAB.

You can find more details at:

Let me know if this helps or you need more details.

Cheers,

Gerardo

Gerardo Capiel
VP of Engineering
Benetech

On Apr 27, 2014, at 11:49 AM, "Paul Prescod" <[hidden email]> wrote:

Please clarify the requirements. Math expressions can already be expressed in a hypothetical markup language like this.

<math-expression  href="http://...."/>

Or:

<math-expression href="data:..."/>

The role of the URI scheme is not to convey the semantics or data type of the resource but rather to supply information on the network location of the resource.

So I am skeptical that this URI scheme is needed. If we went down this path then we would need a URI scheme for images, zip files, documents, movies and so forth.

On Apr 26, 2014 11:28 PM, "Gerardo Capiel" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi,
I'm proposing the creation of a W3C Community Group to discuss a math: URI scheme and Web browser protocol handler. The 'math' URI scheme and protocol handler can be used by Web browsers and other applications to transport mathematical expressions to other applications, such as Assistive Technologies or graphing calculators.  If you are interested this proposal, please join: http://www.w3.org/community/groups/proposed/#mathprotocol.  Below is the provisional URI Scheme Registration Template:
   URI scheme name
      math - The math: URI scheme can be used by Web browsers and other applications to transport mathematical expressions to other applications, such as Assistive Technologies or graphing calculators.

   Status
      Provisional
x
   URI scheme syntax
      Applications launched via the math protocol take as a parameter either a URL to a resource containing a mathematical expression in MathML or other formats or the actual math expression in uncompressed or compressed form. For example:
      math://mathmlcloud.org/m/uniqueexpressionid
      math:<math><mi>x</mi><mo>+</mo><mn>2</mn></math>
      math:<math-compressed>someexpressionincompressedformat</math-compressed>

   URI scheme semantics
      TBD
      
   Encoding considerations
      TBD
      
   Applications/protocols that use this URI scheme name
      Applications should register the math: protocol handler with this scheme.
      
   Interoperability considerations
      TBD
      
   Security considerations
      None known.
      
   Contact
      Gerardo Capiel, [hidden email]
      
   Author/Change controller
      Gerardo Capiel, [hidden email]
      
   References
      [1] http://www.w3.org/community/groups/proposed/#mathprotocol
      [2] https://wiki.benetech.org/display/MATH/Protocol+Handlers+for+External+Applications+to+Process+MathML
      

Gerardo Capiel
VP of Engineering
benetech

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Re: math: URI scheme and protocol handler

Tony Hansen
In reply to this post by Gerardo Capiel
This sounds more like a media type than a URI.

    Tony Hansen

On 4/27/14, 2:56 PM, Gerardo Capiel wrote:
Paul,

Thank you for your questions. The use case is very similar to the mailto URI scheme and protocol handler. We desire a mechanism to launch from a Web browser an application to handle a mathematical expression. 

This idea was prompted by the need for an alternative approach to enable Assistive Technology applications to provide blind students navigation of complex mathematical expressions via Text-To-Speech. The current approach by the leading solution provider, Design Science, is to use an Internet Explorer plugin. This approach no longer works as of IE 11 due to changes in the IE security model and has not been extended to any other browsers. 

As part of my work in the DIAGRAM Center, I have discussed this math: protocol handler with Design Science and other vendors wishing to provide Assistive Technology solutions and they are very interested as it simplifies implementation, particularly across multiple browsers and operating systems.

We also realized that this idea could benefit all students, as it provides a simple mechanism for students to explore mathematical expressions on the Web in math notebooks, such as IPython, or applications such as graphing calculators or MATLAB.

You can find more details at:

Let me know if this helps or you need more details.

Cheers,

Gerardo

Gerardo Capiel
VP of Engineering
Benetech

On Apr 27, 2014, at 11:49 AM, "Paul Prescod" <[hidden email]> wrote:

Please clarify the requirements. Math expressions can already be expressed in a hypothetical markup language like this.

<math-expression  href="http://...."/>

Or:

<math-expression href="data:..."/>

The role of the URI scheme is not to convey the semantics or data type of the resource but rather to supply information on the network location of the resource.

So I am skeptical that this URI scheme is needed. If we went down this path then we would need a URI scheme for images, zip files, documents, movies and so forth.

On Apr 26, 2014 11:28 PM, "Gerardo Capiel" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi,
I'm proposing the creation of a W3C Community Group to discuss a math: URI scheme and Web browser protocol handler. The 'math' URI scheme and protocol handler can be used by Web browsers and other applications to transport mathematical expressions to other applications, such as Assistive Technologies or graphing calculators.  If you are interested this proposal, please join: http://www.w3.org/community/groups/proposed/#mathprotocol.  Below is the provisional URI Scheme Registration Template:
   URI scheme name
      math - The math: URI scheme can be used by Web browsers and other applications to transport mathematical expressions to other applications, such as Assistive Technologies or graphing calculators.

   Status
      Provisional
x
   URI scheme syntax
      Applications launched via the math protocol take as a parameter either a URL to a resource containing a mathematical expression in MathML or other formats or the actual math expression in uncompressed or compressed form. For example:
      math://mathmlcloud.org/m/uniqueexpressionid
      math:<math><mi>x</mi><mo>+</mo><mn>2</mn></math>
      math:<math-compressed>someexpressionincompressedformat</math-compressed>

   URI scheme semantics
      TBD
      
   Encoding considerations
      TBD
      
   Applications/protocols that use this URI scheme name
      Applications should register the math: protocol handler with this scheme.
      
   Interoperability considerations
      TBD
      
   Security considerations
      None known.
      
   Contact
      Gerardo Capiel, [hidden email]
      
   Author/Change controller
      Gerardo Capiel, [hidden email]
      
   References
      [1] http://www.w3.org/community/groups/proposed/#mathprotocol
      [2] https://wiki.benetech.org/display/MATH/Protocol+Handlers+for+External+Applications+to+Process+MathML
      

Gerardo Capiel
VP of Engineering
benetech


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Re: math: URI scheme and protocol handler

Gerardo Capiel
In reply to this post by Paul Prescod-3
I think that's more of a download use case, which is more than we need and also may take more steps, which when dealing with accessibility may be even more painful. I've only seen unzip work well in Safari.

Gerardo Capiel
VP of Engineering
Benetech

On Apr 27, 2014, at 2:26 PM, "Paul Prescod" <[hidden email]> wrote:

Could not the browser trigger a third party tool on the basis of the content type rather than the URI scheme?  This is how zip files trigger unzip applications.

On Apr 27, 2014 11:56 AM, "Gerardo Capiel" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Paul,

Thank you for your questions. The use case is very similar to the mailto URI scheme and protocol handler. We desire a mechanism to launch from a Web browser an application to handle a mathematical expression. 

This idea was prompted by the need for an alternative approach to enable Assistive Technology applications to provide blind students navigation of complex mathematical expressions via Text-To-Speech. The current approach by the leading solution provider, Design Science, is to use an Internet Explorer plugin. This approach no longer works as of IE 11 due to changes in the IE security model and has not been extended to any other browsers. 

As part of my work in the DIAGRAM Center, I have discussed this math: protocol handler with Design Science and other vendors wishing to provide Assistive Technology solutions and they are very interested as it simplifies implementation, particularly across multiple browsers and operating systems.

We also realized that this idea could benefit all students, as it provides a simple mechanism for students to explore mathematical expressions on the Web in math notebooks, such as IPython, or applications such as graphing calculators or MATLAB.

You can find more details at:
<a href="https://wiki.benetech.org/display/MATH/Protocol&#43;Handlers&#43;for&#43;External&#43;Applications&#43;to&#43;Process&#43;MathML" style="background-color:rgba(255,255,255,0)" target="_blank">https://wiki.benetech.org/display/MATH/Protocol+Handlers+for+External+Applications+to+Process+MathML

Let me know if this helps or you need more details.

Cheers,

Gerardo

Gerardo Capiel
VP of Engineering
Benetech

On Apr 27, 2014, at 11:49 AM, "Paul Prescod" <[hidden email]> wrote:

Please clarify the requirements. Math expressions can already be expressed in a hypothetical markup language like this.

<math-expression  href="http://...."/>

Or:

<math-expression href="data:..."/>

The role of the URI scheme is not to convey the semantics or data type of the resource but rather to supply information on the network location of the resource.

So I am skeptical that this URI scheme is needed. If we went down this path then we would need a URI scheme for images, zip files, documents, movies and so forth.

On Apr 26, 2014 11:28 PM, "Gerardo Capiel" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi,
I'm proposing the creation of a W3C Community Group to discuss a math: URI scheme and Web browser protocol handler. The 'math' URI scheme and protocol handler can be used by Web browsers and other applications to transport mathematical expressions to other applications, such as Assistive Technologies or graphing calculators.  If you are interested this proposal, please join: http://www.w3.org/community/groups/proposed/#mathprotocol.  Below is the provisional URI Scheme Registration Template:
   URI scheme name
      math - The math: URI scheme can be used by Web browsers and other applications to transport mathematical expressions to other applications, such as Assistive Technologies or graphing calculators.

   Status
      Provisional
x
   URI scheme syntax
      Applications launched via the math protocol take as a parameter either a URL to a resource containing a mathematical expression in MathML or other formats or the actual math expression in uncompressed or compressed form. For example:
      math://mathmlcloud.org/m/uniqueexpressionid
      math:<math><mi>x</mi><mo>+</mo><mn>2</mn></math>
      math:<math-compressed>someexpressionincompressedformat</math-compressed>

   URI scheme semantics
      TBD
      
   Encoding considerations
      TBD
      
   Applications/protocols that use this URI scheme name
      Applications should register the math: protocol handler with this scheme.
      
   Interoperability considerations
      TBD
      
   Security considerations
      None known.
      
   Contact
      Gerardo Capiel, [hidden email]
      
   Author/Change controller
      Gerardo Capiel, [hidden email]
      
   References
      [1] http://www.w3.org/community/groups/proposed/#mathprotocol
      [2] <a href="https://wiki.benetech.org/display/MATH/Protocol&#43;Handlers&#43;for&#43;External&#43;Applications&#43;to&#43;Process&#43;MathML" target="_blank">https://wiki.benetech.org/display/MATH/Protocol+Handlers+for+External+Applications+to+Process+MathML
      

Gerardo Capiel
VP of Engineering
benetech

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Re: math: URI scheme and protocol handler

Martin J. Dürst
In reply to this post by Tony Hansen
On 2014/04/28 06:31, Tony Hansen wrote:
> This sounds more like a media type than a URI.
>
>      Tony Hansen

Very much so indeed. And of course there is already a media type (or
actually three :-) for MathML:
http://www.iana.org/assignments/media-types/media-types.xhtml#application
http://www.w3.org/TR/MathML3/appendixb.html

Also, it's easy to create an URI from some data and a media type (Paul
already gave a strong hint below):
data:application/mathml+xml,<math><mi>x</mi><mo>+</mo><mn>2</mn></math>

Regards,   Martin.

> On 4/27/14, 2:56 PM, Gerardo Capiel wrote:
>> Paul,
>>
>> Thank you for your questions. The use case is very similar to the
>> mailto URI scheme and protocol handler. We desire a mechanism to
>> launch from a Web browser an application to handle a mathematical
>> expression.
>>
>> This idea was prompted by the need for an alternative approach to
>> enable Assistive Technology applications to provide blind students
>> navigation of complex mathematical expressions via Text-To-Speech. The
>> current approach by the leading solution provider, Design Science, is
>> to use an Internet Explorer plugin. This approach no longer works as
>> of IE 11 due to changes in the IE security model and has not been
>> extended to any other browsers.
>>
>> As part of my work in the DIAGRAM Center, I have discussed this math:
>> protocol handler with Design Science and other vendors wishing to
>> provide Assistive Technology solutions and they are very interested as
>> it simplifies implementation, particularly across multiple browsers
>> and operating systems.
>>
>> We also realized that this idea could benefit all students, as it
>> provides a simple mechanism for students to explore mathematical
>> expressions on the Web in math notebooks, such as IPython, or
>> applications such as graphing calculators or MATLAB.
>>
>> You can find more details at:
>> https://wiki.benetech.org/display/MATH/Protocol+Handlers+for+External+Applications+to+Process+MathML
>>
>>
>> Let me know if this helps or you need more details.
>>
>> Cheers,
>>
>> Gerardo
>>
>> Gerardo Capiel
>> VP of Engineering
>> Benetech
>>
>> On Apr 27, 2014, at 11:49 AM, "Paul Prescod" <[hidden email]
>> <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>>
>>> Please clarify the requirements. Math expressions can already be
>>> expressed in a hypothetical markup language like this.
>>>
>>> <math-expression  href="http://...."/>
>>>
>>> Or:
>>>
>>> <math-expression href="data:..."/>
>>>
>>> The role of the URI scheme is not to convey the semantics or data
>>> type of the resource but rather to supply information on the network
>>> location of the resource.
>>>
>>> So I am skeptical that this URI scheme is needed. If we went down
>>> this path then we would need a URI scheme for images, zip files,
>>> documents, movies and so forth.
>>>
>>> On Apr 26, 2014 11:28 PM, "Gerardo Capiel" <[hidden email]
>>> <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>>>
>>>     Hi,
>>>
>>>     I'm proposing the creation of a W3C Community Group to discuss a
>>> math: URI scheme and Web browser protocol handler. The 'math' URI
>>> scheme and protocol handler can be used by Web browsers and other
>>> applications to transport mathematical expressions to other
>>> applications, such as Assistive Technologies or graphing
>>> calculators.  If you are interested this proposal, please
>>> join:http://www.w3.org/community/groups/proposed/#mathprotocol.
>>> Below is the provisional URI Scheme Registration Template:
>>>
>>>     *    URI scheme name
>>>     *       math - The math: URI scheme can be used by Web browsers
>>> and other applications to transport mathematical expressions to other
>>> applications, such as Assistive Technologies or graphing calculators.
>>>
>>>     *    Status
>>>     *       Provisional
>>>     x
>>>     *    URI scheme syntax
>>>     *       Applications launched via the math protocol take as a
>>> parameter either a URL to a resource containing a mathematical
>>> expression in MathML or other formats or the actual math expression
>>> in uncompressed or compressed form. For example:
>>>            math://mathmlcloud.org/m/uniqueexpressionid
>>>            math:<math><mi>x</mi><mo>+</mo><mn>2</mn></math>
>>>
>>> math:<math-compressed>someexpressionincompressedformat</math-compressed>
>>>
>>>     *    URI scheme semantics
>>>     *       TBD
>>>     *    Encoding considerations
>>>     *       TBD
>>>     *    Applications/protocols that use this URI scheme name
>>>     *       Applications should register the math: protocol handler
>>> with this scheme.
>>>     *    Interoperability considerations
>>>     *       TBD
>>>     *    Security considerations
>>>     *       None known.
>>>     *    Contact
>>>     *       Gerardo Capiel,[hidden email]
>>> <mailto:[hidden email]>
>>>     *    Author/Change controller
>>>     *       Gerardo Capiel,[hidden email]
>>> <mailto:[hidden email]>
>>>     *    References
>>>     *       [1]http://www.w3.org/community/groups/proposed/#mathprotocol
>>>
>>> [2]https://wiki.benetech.org/display/MATH/Protocol+Handlers+for+External+Applications+to+Process+MathML
>>>
>>>
>>>     Gerardo Capiel
>>>     VP of Engineering
>>>     benetech
>>>
>
>

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Re: math: URI scheme and protocol handler

Gerardo Capiel
In reply to this post by Gerardo Capiel
I created a short YouTube video to demonstrate why a protocol handler with a math: URI scheme can provide an alternative and simple user experience for a blind or vision impaired user for exploring mathematical expressions.  In the video, 1) we turn on VoiceOver (the OS X screen reader / assistive technology), 2) we navigate a page that contains text and a mathematical expression, 3) we decide that we want to use another application other than Safari to explore and understand the math expression and click on the math expression which has an anchor tag around it (e.g., <a href="math:<math>something</math>">), 4) the operating system launches the application registered to handle math: protocol requests, 5) the application provides tools for exploring the math, 6) after using the application, the user quits the application and seamlessly returns back to the web browser where they left off. 


I hope this helps to illustrate why a protocol handler provides a more seamless experience with the current state of browser implementations than a media type could today.

Gerardo

Gerardo Capiel
VP of Engineering
benetech

650-644-3405 - Twitter: @gcapiel - GPG: 0x859F11C4
Fork, Code, Do Social Good: http://benetech.github.com/

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Re: math: URI scheme and protocol handler

mamund
Gerardo:
This is a great idea -- and the protocol element of URIs is not the correct vector for executing it.

IMO, the best place for this is as an element: <mathspeak>....</mathspeak>.

An alternative (atho more complex) would be to use the "rel" attribute of an HTML link: <a rel="mathspeak">...</a>

Just as "rel='stylesheet'" has a special meaning in browsers, rel="mathspeak" can be used as the launch for a browser plug-in that knows how to process math expressions. Another reason to use rel="mathspeak" (and not the protocol element of a link) is that the href value *could* be used to point to an external address that knows how to process "mathspeak" strings. IOW, you can support "mathspeak" speech internally (with a plug-in) or, if no plug-in is available, use the href to point to an available processor.

Cheers.




On Mon, Apr 28, 2014 at 2:55 AM, Gerardo Capiel <[hidden email]> wrote:
I created a short YouTube video to demonstrate why a protocol handler with a math: URI scheme can provide an alternative and simple user experience for a blind or vision impaired user for exploring mathematical expressions.  In the video, 1) we turn on VoiceOver (the OS X screen reader / assistive technology), 2) we navigate a page that contains text and a mathematical expression, 3) we decide that we want to use another application other than Safari to explore and understand the math expression and click on the math expression which has an anchor tag around it (e.g., <a href="math:<math>something</math>">), 4) the operating system launches the application registered to handle math: protocol requests, 5) the application provides tools for exploring the math, 6) after using the application, the user quits the application and seamlessly returns back to the web browser where they left off. 


I hope this helps to illustrate why a protocol handler provides a more seamless experience with the current state of browser implementations than a media type could today.

Gerardo

Gerardo Capiel
VP of Engineering
benetech

<a href="tel:650-644-3405" value="+16506443405" target="_blank">650-644-3405 - Twitter: @gcapiel - GPG: 0x859F11C4
Fork, Code, Do Social Good: http://benetech.github.com/


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RE: math: URI scheme and protocol handler

Michael Wojcik

[Ugh - HTML email, which Outlook is unable to correctly reply to except by top-posting.]

 

Quoting mike amundsen:

 

                the best place for this is as an element: <mathspeak>

 

Are you proposing a new HTML5 element? A new MathML element?

 

                An alternative ... would be to use the "rel" attribute

 

With either a new element or a new token for the value of the rel attribute, user agents (browsers) have to be updated to recognize an extension to some markup language. How is that different from updating user agents to provide additional handling for MathML to enable text-to-speech?

 

For that matter, how is adding a new URI scheme (which user agents will have to recognize to make it usable) any different from simply having them recognize when a MathML assistive-technology application is available? OK, Gerado's page notes that some browsers support extending their set of URI-scheme handlers; but then many browsers support plug-ins, so it's six-of-one.

 

And if we introduce a new URI scheme, or rel-attribute value, or (worst of all) HTML element for the fairly specific task of rendering mathematical equations as speech, that looks like a slippery slope into all sorts of special-purpose extensions. If there's an opportunity to solve a general problem rather than a specific one I'd prefer to see it taken.

 

If we're talking about accessibility and assistive technologies, then CSS strikes me as a more plausible place to extend a specification, since a number of accessibility issues are handled there, for example with media types.

 

In short, I don't see how any of the proposals in this thread except the use of a data-scheme URI provides a general and properly-scoped solution.

 

Michael Wojcik
Technology Specialist, Micro Focus

 

 

 

From: mike amundsen [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, 28 April, 2014 03:09
To: Gerardo Capiel
Cc: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: math: URI scheme and protocol handler

 

Gerardo:

This is a great idea -- and the protocol element of URIs is not the correct vector for executing it.

 

IMO, the best place for this is as an element: <mathspeak>....</mathspeak>.

 

An alternative (atho more complex) would be to use the "rel" attribute of an HTML link: <a rel="mathspeak">...</a>

 

Just as "rel='stylesheet'" has a special meaning in browsers, rel="mathspeak" can be used as the launch for a browser plug-in that knows how to process math expressions. Another reason to use rel="mathspeak" (and not the protocol element of a link) is that the href value *could* be used to point to an external address that knows how to process "mathspeak" strings. IOW, you can support "mathspeak" speech internally (with a plug-in) or, if no plug-in is available, use the href to point to an available processor.

 

Cheers.

 


 

On Mon, Apr 28, 2014 at 2:55 AM, Gerardo Capiel <[hidden email]> wrote:

I created a short YouTube video to demonstrate why a protocol handler with a math: URI scheme can provide an alternative and simple user experience for a blind or vision impaired user for exploring mathematical expressions.  In the video, 1) we turn on VoiceOver (the OS X screen reader / assistive technology), 2) we navigate a page that contains text and a mathematical expression, 3) we decide that we want to use another application other than Safari to explore and understand the math expression and click on the math expression which has an anchor tag around it (e.g., <a href="math:<math>something</math>">), 4) the operating system launches the application registered to handle math: protocol requests, 5) the application provides tools for exploring the math, 6) after using the application, the user quits the application and seamlessly returns back to the web browser where they left off. 

 

 

I hope this helps to illustrate why a protocol handler provides a more seamless experience with the current state of browser implementations than a media type could today.

 

Gerardo

 

Gerardo Capiel

VP of Engineering

benetech

 

<a href="tel:650-644-3405" target="_blank">650-644-3405 - Twitter: @gcapiel - GPG: 0x859F11C4

Fork, Code, Do Social Good: http://benetech.github.com/

 

 

 

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Re: math: URI scheme and protocol handler

Gerardo Capiel
In reply to this post by mamund
Mike,

Thanks for your feedback. The plugin approach has already been implemented by Design Science and the effort to maintaining a plugin to process the existing <math> elements for MathML has been painful. As a result, currently the plugin does not work with IE 11, it's buggy with IE 10 and is not available on any other browsers. Because this is a small market, no one else has the resources to take this approach either.

This is why I'm suggesting an alternate approach that is easier to develop for and maintain.

Gerardo

Gerardo Capiel
VP of Engineering
Benetech

On Apr 28, 2014, at 12:09 AM, "mike amundsen" <[hidden email]> wrote:

Gerardo:
This is a great idea -- and the protocol element of URIs is not the correct vector for executing it.

IMO, the best place for this is as an element: <mathspeak>....</mathspeak>.

An alternative (atho more complex) would be to use the "rel" attribute of an HTML link: <a rel="mathspeak">...</a>

Just as "rel='stylesheet'" has a special meaning in browsers, rel="mathspeak" can be used as the launch for a browser plug-in that knows how to process math expressions. Another reason to use rel="mathspeak" (and not the protocol element of a link) is that the href value *could* be used to point to an external address that knows how to process "mathspeak" strings. IOW, you can support "mathspeak" speech internally (with a plug-in) or, if no plug-in is available, use the href to point to an available processor.

Cheers.




On Mon, Apr 28, 2014 at 2:55 AM, Gerardo Capiel <[hidden email]> wrote:
I created a short YouTube video to demonstrate why a protocol handler with a math: URI scheme can provide an alternative and simple user experience for a blind or vision impaired user for exploring mathematical expressions.  In the video, 1) we turn on VoiceOver (the OS X screen reader / assistive technology), 2) we navigate a page that contains text and a mathematical expression, 3) we decide that we want to use another application other than Safari to explore and understand the math expression and click on the math expression which has an anchor tag around it (e.g., <a href="math:<math>something</math>">), 4) the operating system launches the application registered to handle math: protocol requests, 5) the application provides tools for exploring the math, 6) after using the application, the user quits the application and seamlessly returns back to the web browser where they left off. 


I hope this helps to illustrate why a protocol handler provides a more seamless experience with the current state of browser implementations than a media type could today.

Gerardo

Gerardo Capiel
VP of Engineering
benetech

<a href="tel:650-644-3405" value="&#43;16506443405" target="_blank">650-644-3405 - Twitter: @gcapiel - GPG: 0x859F11C4
Fork, Code, Do Social Good: http://benetech.github.com/


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Re: math: URI scheme and protocol handler

Paul Prescod-3
In reply to this post by Gerardo Capiel
Thank you, that video clarified.

The way the browsers are implemented, it is more seamless to launch an external application with some data using a URL protocol rather than a content-type.

http://www.chromeplugins.org/google/chrome-plugins/how-start-external-applications-9717.html

I have done this myself in the past.

I don't know what to say: the implementation defects of the browsers are at odds with how web architecture is supposed to work. URL handlers are not supposed to be application-launchers. They are supposed to describe the actual protocol for downloading or manipulating data. Think of the mess that will arise if every file format also needs a standardized URI format as a way of working around browser behaviours.

If you do not worry about a formal standardization process at the W3C then nobody will care that you are using URIs in this way.

The systemic fix is that HTML should have a way of stating that the target file is designed to be "transient" and the user should not be harassed about a filename for storage. If the user wants to save the data then they could do a "Save As" from the viewer app.



On Sun, Apr 27, 2014 at 11:55 PM, Gerardo Capiel <[hidden email]> wrote:
I created a short YouTube video to demonstrate why a protocol handler with a math: URI scheme can provide an alternative and simple user experience for a blind or vision impaired user for exploring mathematical expressions.  In the video, 1) we turn on VoiceOver (the OS X screen reader / assistive technology), 2) we navigate a page that contains text and a mathematical expression, 3) we decide that we want to use another application other than Safari to explore and understand the math expression and click on the math expression which has an anchor tag around it (e.g., <a href="math:<math>something</math>">), 4) the operating system launches the application registered to handle math: protocol requests, 5) the application provides tools for exploring the math, 6) after using the application, the user quits the application and seamlessly returns back to the web browser where they left off. 


I hope this helps to illustrate why a protocol handler provides a more seamless experience with the current state of browser implementations than a media type could today.

Gerardo

Gerardo Capiel
VP of Engineering
benetech

<a href="tel:650-644-3405" value="+16506443405" target="_blank">650-644-3405 - Twitter: @gcapiel - GPG: 0x859F11C4
Fork, Code, Do Social Good: http://benetech.github.com/


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Re: math: URI scheme and protocol handler

Julian Reschke
On 2014-04-29 10:42, Paul Prescod wrote:

> Thank you, that video clarified.
>
> The way the browsers are implemented, it is more seamless to launch an
> external application with some data using a URL protocol rather than a
> content-type.
>
> http://www.chromeplugins.org/google/chrome-plugins/how-start-external-applications-9717.html
>
> I have done this myself in the past.
>
> I don't know what to say: the implementation defects of the browsers are
> at odds with how web architecture is supposed to work. URL handlers are
> not supposed to be application-launchers. They are supposed to describe
> the actual protocol for downloading or manipulating data. Think of the
> mess that will arise if every file format also needs a standardized URI
> format as a way of working around browser behaviours.
>
> If you do not worry about a formal standardization process at the W3C
> then nobody will care that you are using URIs in this way.
>
> The systemic fix is that HTML should have a way of stating that the
> target file is designed to be "transient" and the user should not be
> harassed about a filename for storage. If the user wants to save the
> data then they could do a "Save As" from the viewer app.
> ....

Not sure what you're trying to fix here. If the browser knows the
handler for the media type, it's supposed to download to a temporary
file and pass that to the media type handler.

Best regards, Julian

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Re: math: URI scheme and protocol handler

Paul Prescod-3
Not sure what you're trying to fix here. If the browser knows the handler for the media type, it's supposed to download to a temporary file and pass that to the media type handler.

That's not generally what it does.

It downloads it to a persistent file and passes *that* to the media type handler.

And depending on browser settings it may ask you where to put the persistent file.

The gist is that the browser does not know the difference between a downloaded legal document that should be stored forever in an easy to find place and a downloaded equation which is likely not very relevant for long-term use.



On Tue, Apr 29, 2014 at 2:05 AM, Julian Reschke <[hidden email]> wrote:
On 2014-04-29 10:42, Paul Prescod wrote:
Thank you, that video clarified.

The way the browsers are implemented, it is more seamless to launch an
external application with some data using a URL protocol rather than a
content-type.

http://www.chromeplugins.org/google/chrome-plugins/how-start-external-applications-9717.html

I have done this myself in the past.

I don't know what to say: the implementation defects of the browsers are
at odds with how web architecture is supposed to work. URL handlers are
not supposed to be application-launchers. They are supposed to describe
the actual protocol for downloading or manipulating data. Think of the
mess that will arise if every file format also needs a standardized URI
format as a way of working around browser behaviours.

If you do not worry about a formal standardization process at the W3C
then nobody will care that you are using URIs in this way.

The systemic fix is that HTML should have a way of stating that the
target file is designed to be "transient" and the user should not be
harassed about a filename for storage. If the user wants to save the
data then they could do a "Save As" from the viewer app.
....

Not sure what you're trying to fix here. If the browser knows the handler for the media type, it's supposed to download to a temporary file and pass that to the media type handler.

Best regards, Julian

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RE: math: URI scheme and protocol handler

masinter

>Not sure what you're trying to fix here. If the browser knows the handler for the media type, it's supposed to download to a temporary file and pass that to the media type handler.

 

>That's not generally what it does.

>It downloads it to a persistent file and passes *that* to the media type handler.

 

>And depending on browser settings it may ask you where to put the persistent file.

 

>The gist is that the browser does not know the difference between a downloaded legal document that should be stored forever in an easy to find place and a downloaded equation which is likely not very relevant for long-term use.

 

Content-Disposition response header is how the browser knows for http: URIs. For file: URIs, nothing gets downloaded so nothing should be asked. The browser doesn’t know with ftp: URIs, but it also doesn’t know content-type.  Data: URIs are always ‘temporary’.

 

Larry

--

http://larry.masinter.net