More on not using Screen Magnification as an example

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More on not using Screen Magnification as an example

Wayne Dick-3
 The reason screen magnification does not belong in the new
 Accessibility API Mappings 1.1 document is because the primary
 functions of screen magnification and the accessibility APIs are
 disjoint. Screen magnification works just as well on a bitmap as
 it does on a WCAG 2.0 Level AAA document with perfect ARIA.

I am fully aware that modern screen magnification software uses
some features of the DOM supported by WCAG 2.0. These are mostly
used to enable vertical navigation.  I have not experienced any
evidence of screen magnification vendors using ARIA, but maybe
someone knows more on this.

The main point is this. The primary work of a screen magnifier
is enlargement with very intelligent curve smoothing.  While
this requires really smart programming the same effect can be
achieved with a closed circuit TV.   Screen magnification has
no place in a document about APIs that support assistive
technology. CCTVs and magnifying glasses are  just as relevant
screen magnifiers in this context.

In fact, magnfying glasses and closed circuit TV is just as relevant as screen magnification within the entire context of WCAG.  WCAG is unnecessary for screen magnification to work.

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RE: More on not using Screen Magnification as an example

Jonathan Avila-2

[Wayne wrote]

 

>  Screen magnification works just as well on a bitmap as
 it does on a WCAG 2.0 Level AAA document with perfect ARIA.

 

While I am not a screen magnification developer – I believe this may be an over simplification.  There are many aspects of assisting with magnification that you cannot do with an image.  For example, focus tracking can be very important. Tracking of programmatic focus is used to move the magnified view.  Words can be programmatically highlighted in the magnified view of a web page, focus enhancement can be layered on top of focus and caret tracking to assist users in finding the caret and/or focused control.

 

> I have not experienced any
evidence of screen magnification vendors using ARIA, but maybe
someone knows more on this.

 

Screen magnifiers such as ZoomText pay attention to the aria-activedescendant attribute or it’s API implementation to track focus on controls such as toolbars, tabs, and menus where this attribute can be used.

 

Ø  .   Screen magnification has
no place in a document about APIs that support assistive
technology. CCTVs and magnifying glasses are  just as relevant
screen magnifiers in this context.

Screen magnification software can track changes in content in parts of the screen and it can be used to only magnify part of the screen.  It can track focus and it can be combined and communicate with other assistive technology such as a screen readers (e.g. MAGic and JAWS).  Screen magnifiers are most definitely watching WinEvents such as obj_focus, value_changed, system_alert, and other programmatic events sent from the application operating system.

 

Jonathan

 

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SSB BART Group
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From: Wayne Dick [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Thursday, April 23, 2015 7:49 PM
To: WAI Interest Group
Subject: More on not using Screen Magnification as an example

 

 The reason screen magnification does not belong in the new
 Accessibility API Mappings 1.1 document is because the primary
 functions of screen magnification and the accessibility APIs are
 disjoint. Screen magnification works just as well on a bitmap as
 it does on a WCAG 2.0 Level AAA document with perfect ARIA.

I am fully aware that modern screen magnification software uses
some features of the DOM supported by WCAG 2.0. These are mostly
used to enable vertical navigation.  I have not experienced any
evidence of screen magnification vendors using ARIA, but maybe
someone knows more on this.

The main point is this. The primary work of a screen magnifier
is enlargement with very intelligent curve smoothing.  While
this requires really smart programming the same effect can be
achieved with a closed circuit TV.   Screen magnification has
no place in a document about APIs that support assistive
technology. CCTVs and magnifying glasses are  just as relevant
screen magnifiers in this context.

In fact, magnfying glasses and closed circuit TV is just as relevant as screen magnification within the entire context of WCAG.  WCAG is unnecessary for screen magnification to work.

 

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RE: More on not using Screen Magnification as an example

Phill Jenkins
Jonathan makes several key critical points (e.g. focus tracking, label relationships) about the difference between screen magnification and screen magnifiers assistive technologies.  

Magnification is only one simple component of an AT screen magnifier like ZoomText with Speech (1) and MAGic (2)

Perhaps there isn't a clear understanding between the difference in terms such as:
        browser zoom,
        platform zoom,
        hardware screen magnification,
        and advanced capabilities and features
of assistive technology (AT) screen magnifiers.

Remember too that the web developer / author is only responsible for half of the solution, the platform +  browser + AT + end user settings are the other half.  
See http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/components.php

1. http://www.aisquared.com/zoomtext/more/zoomtext_magnifier_reader/
2. http://www.freedomscientific.com/Products/LowVision/MAGic
____________________________________________
Regards,
Phill Jenkins,
IBM Accessibility
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Re: More on not using Screen Magnification as an example

Wayne Dick-3
I am not disputing Phill or Jon. ZoomText has really been good on the uptake for accessibility features, and there is a vast difference between screen magnifier assistive technology and system zoom.  That being said, people buy ZoomText, Magic and Luna for the very high quality zoom. The other stuff makes life in zoom world tolerable.

In the technology world of the web, data flexibility is a foundational principle.  It is just disappointing to see that WAI seems to think zoom is sufficient accessibility support for obtaining therapeutically useful text size. I don't want to be insulting, but it just feels lazy.

Wayne

On Fri, Apr 24, 2015 at 12:16 PM, Phill Jenkins <[hidden email]> wrote:
Jonathan makes several key critical points (e.g. focus tracking, label relationships) about the difference between screen magnification and screen magnifiers assistive technologies.  

Magnification is only one simple component of an AT screen magnifier like ZoomText with Speech (1) and MAGic (2)

Perhaps there isn't a clear understanding between the difference in terms such as:
        browser zoom,
        platform zoom,
        hardware screen magnification,
        and advanced capabilities and features
of assistive technology (AT) screen magnifiers.

Remember too that the web developer / author is only responsible for half of the solution, the platform +  browser + AT + end user settings are the other half.  
See http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/components.php

1. http://www.aisquared.com/zoomtext/more/zoomtext_magnifier_reader/
2. http://www.freedomscientific.com/Products/LowVision/MAGic
____________________________________________
Regards,
Phill Jenkins,
IBM Accessibility

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Re: More on not using Screen Magnification as an example

Felix Miata-2
Wayne Dick composed on 2015-04-24 16:39 (UTC-0700):

> It is just disappointing to see that WAI seems to think zoom is
> sufficient accessibility support for obtaining therapeutically useful text
> size. I don't want to be insulting, but it just feels lazy.

Definitely.
--
"The wise are known for their understanding, and pleasant
words are persuasive." Proverbs 16:21 (New Living Translation)

 Team OS/2 ** Reg. Linux User #211409 ** a11y rocks!

Felix Miata  ***  http://fm.no-ip.com/

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RE: More on not using Screen Magnification as an example

Jonathan Avila-2
In reply to this post by Wayne Dick-3

Ø  In the technology world of the web, data flexibility is a foundational principle.  It is just disappointing to see that WAI seems to think zoom is sufficient accessibility support for obtaining therapeutically useful text size. I don't want to be insulting, but it just feels lazy.

This is exemplified by the sufficient techniques for SC 1.4.4 which allow browser zoom to meet this success criteria.  I’ll also point that many in the group assume(d) that browser zoom really couldn’t be broken by the page author and thus this SC would just automatically pass.  This is indeed not the case and I am finding there are many ways to break browser zoom.  Thankfully many sites are going to responsive design which is often triggered by browser zoom and may result in larger text without horizontal scrolling.

 

Jonathan

 

From: Wayne Dick [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Friday, April 24, 2015 7:39 PM
To: Phill Jenkins
Cc: Jonathan Avila; WAI Interest Group
Subject: Re: More on not using Screen Magnification as an example

 

I am not disputing Phill or Jon. ZoomText has really been good on the uptake for accessibility features, and there is a vast difference between screen magnifier assistive technology and system zoom.  That being said, people buy ZoomText, Magic and Luna for the very high quality zoom. The other stuff makes life in zoom world tolerable.

In the technology world of the web, data flexibility is a foundational principle.  It is just disappointing to see that WAI seems to think zoom is sufficient accessibility support for obtaining therapeutically useful text size. I don't want to be insulting, but it just feels lazy.

Wayne

 

On Fri, Apr 24, 2015 at 12:16 PM, Phill Jenkins <[hidden email]> wrote:

Jonathan makes several key critical points (e.g. focus tracking, label relationships) about the difference between screen magnification and screen magnifiers assistive technologies.  

Magnification is only one simple component of an AT screen magnifier like ZoomText with Speech (1) and MAGic (2)

Perhaps there isn't a clear understanding between the difference in terms such as:
        browser zoom,
        platform zoom,
        hardware screen magnification,
        and advanced capabilities and features
of assistive technology (AT) screen magnifiers.

Remember too that the web developer / author is only responsible for half of the solution, the platform +  browser + AT + end user settings are the other half.  
See http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/components.php

1. http://www.aisquared.com/zoomtext/more/zoomtext_magnifier_reader/
2. http://www.freedomscientific.com/Products/LowVision/MAGic
____________________________________________
Regards,
Phill Jenkins,
IBM Accessibility