Handling Tab Strips On The Web

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Handling Tab Strips On The Web

Jim Homme
Hi,
I'm starting to feel that the best way for a developer to handle tab strips on web pages is to put the ARIA application role around them to force the screen reader to use that mode, but wanted to get some opinions on how to handle this sort of thing. I'm asking about this because I'm a screen reader user trying to understand what to tell developers to do, and trying to keep my personal opinions out of the answer and failing to some degree. I'm looking at a web page that has tab controls part way down and thinking to myself that I'm torn between wanting the screen reader to automatically go into application mode and not wanting it to do that because I want to keep reading past the tab controls to see what else is there because that's how normal browse mode works.

I hope this half made sense.

Thanks.

Jim

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RE: Handling Tab Strips On The Web

Jonathan Avila-2
> I'm starting to feel that the best way for a developer to handle tab strips on web pages is to put the ARIA application role around them to force the screen reader to use that mode

Jim, in my view you should not use role of application.  Screen readers like NVDA and JAWS support automatically going into forms and focus mode when you tab to the tab controls.  Using application may prevent some screen readers like NVDA from showing the user the content within the role application in the virtual cursor or browse mode.  The user should be in control not be forced into a mode by the developer.

Jonathan

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-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Homme [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 2016 4:15 PM
To: WAI IG
Subject: Handling Tab Strips On The Web

Hi,
I'm starting to feel that the best way for a developer to handle tab strips on web pages is to put the ARIA application role around them to force the screen reader to use that mode, but wanted to get some opinions on how to handle this sort of thing. I'm asking about this because I'm a screen reader user trying to understand what to tell developers to do, and trying to keep my personal opinions out of the answer and failing to some degree. I'm looking at a web page that has tab controls part way down and thinking to myself that I'm torn between wanting the screen reader to automatically go into application mode and not wanting it to do that because I want to keep reading past the tab controls to see what else is there because that's how normal browse mode works.

I hope this half made sense.

Thanks.

Jim


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RE: Handling Tab Strips On The Web

Beranek, Nicholas
In reply to this post by Jim Homme
Hi Jim,

We recommend the WAI-ARIA design pattern for the Tab Panel: https://www.w3.org/TR/wai-aria-practices/#tabpanel 

My experience with NVDA using this pattern is positive. It appears to emulate pretty well the native OS experience within dialog boxes. If I want to exit application mode, I'll simply hit Insert + Space or Tab out of the tab list. As long as the proper keyboard considerations have been made, it's not difficult to bypass this block.

Thanks,

Nick Beranek
Capital One

-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Homme [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 2016 4:15 PM
To: WAI IG
Subject: Handling Tab Strips On The Web

Hi,
I'm starting to feel that the best way for a developer to handle tab strips on web pages is to put the ARIA application role around them to force the screen reader to use that mode, but wanted to get some opinions on how to handle this sort of thing. I'm asking about this because I'm a screen reader user trying to understand what to tell developers to do, and trying to keep my personal opinions out of the answer and failing to some degree. I'm looking at a web page that has tab controls part way down and thinking to myself that I'm torn between wanting the screen reader to automatically go into application mode and not wanting it to do that because I want to keep reading past the tab controls to see what else is there because that's how normal browse mode works.

I hope this half made sense.

Thanks.

Jim

________________________________________________________

The information contained in this e-mail is confidential and/or proprietary to Capital One and/or its affiliates and may only be used solely in performance of work or services for Capital One. The information transmitted herewith is intended only for use by the individual or entity to which it is addressed. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any review, retransmission, dissemination, distribution, copying or other use of, or taking of any action in reliance upon this information is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please contact the sender and delete the material from your computer.


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RE: Handling Tab Strips On The Web

Sean Murphy (seanmmur)
In reply to this post by Jim Homme
Hi Jim,

As a screen reader user myself, I understand the dilemma.  Based upon Wc3, application mode is not recommended to be used when standard controls are available. Refer too: http://www.w3.org/TR/aria-in-html/#using-aria-role-application

Personally, I would even go as far as application mode is the last resort. Since you lose the normal navigation functionality that the average screen user is expecting. Using forms mode to change the view should be used and should be one tab stop for the element.



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Accessibility Software engineer
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-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Homme [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Thursday, 28 July 2016 6:15 AM
To: WAI IG <[hidden email]>
Subject: Handling Tab Strips On The Web

Hi,
I'm starting to feel that the best way for a developer to handle tab strips on web pages is to put the ARIA application role around them to force the screen reader to use that mode, but wanted to get some opinions on how to handle this sort of thing. I'm asking about this because I'm a screen reader user trying to understand what to tell developers to do, and trying to keep my personal opinions out of the answer and failing to some degree. I'm looking at a web page that has tab controls part way down and thinking to myself that I'm torn between wanting the screen reader to automatically go into application mode and not wanting it to do that because I want to keep reading past the tab controls to see what else is there because that's how normal browse mode works.

I hope this half made sense.

Thanks.

Jim


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Re: Handling Tab Strips On The Web

Bart Simons-2
In reply to this post by Beranek, Nicholas
Dear all,

I totally agree that role=application should not be used and the design
pattern should be followed.
But I can also understand Jim's confusion because the examples provided
under the design pattern *are* using role=application.
Can we please get rid of these Open Ajax Alliance examples in the ARIA
documentation. They use role=application and thus are not an example of
what is explained above.

Instead, we always refer developers to this jQuery Accessible tab panel
system:
http://a11y.nicolas-hoffmann.net/tabs/
It is created and maintained on Github by a wonderful developer called
Nicolas Hoffmann

Kind regards


--
Bart Simons
AnySurfer, towards an accessible internet

Op 27/07/2016 22:35, Beranek, Nicholas schreef:

> Hi Jim,
>
> We recommend the WAI-ARIA design pattern for the Tab Panel: https://www.w3.org/TR/wai-aria-practices/#tabpanel
>
> My experience with NVDA using this pattern is positive. It appears to emulate pretty well the native OS experience within dialog boxes. If I want to exit application mode, I'll simply hit Insert + Space or Tab out of the tab list. As long as the proper keyboard considerations have been made, it's not difficult to bypass this block.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Nick Beranek
> Capital One
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Jim Homme [mailto:[hidden email]]
> Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 2016 4:15 PM
> To: WAI IG
> Subject: Handling Tab Strips On The Web
>
> Hi,
> I'm starting to feel that the best way for a developer to handle tab strips on web pages is to put the ARIA application role around them to force the screen reader to use that mode, but wanted to get some opinions on how to handle this sort of thing. I'm asking about this because I'm a screen reader user trying to understand what to tell developers to do, and trying to keep my personal opinions out of the answer and failing to some degree. I'm looking at a web page that has tab controls part way down and thinking to myself that I'm torn between wanting the screen reader to automatically go into application mode and not wanting it to do that because I want to keep reading past the tab controls to see what else is there because that's how normal browse mode works.
>
> I hope this half made sense.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Jim
>
> ________________________________________________________
>
> The information contained in this e-mail is confidential and/or proprietary to Capital One and/or its affiliates and may only be used solely in performance of work or services for Capital One. The information transmitted herewith is intended only for use by the individual or entity to which it is addressed. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any review, retransmission, dissemination, distribution, copying or other use of, or taking of any action in reliance upon this information is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please contact the sender and delete the material from your computer.
>
>