Benefits of application/xhtml+xml

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Benefits of application/xhtml+xml

Karl Dubost

Hi,

As I have experienced for myself, there is one clear benefit of using  
XHTML served as application/xhtml+xml.

When developing a Web site with two platforms:
        - Development
        - Production

It's possible to use application/xhtml+xml at the development phase.  
If the pages are invalid, there will not be displayed and/or having a  
message showing the mistake depending on the browser. Then it helps
        - catching errors/mistakes
        - creating a more robust workflow.

It is certainly a minor benefit in many cases, but for my case it has  
been a good one.




--
Karl Dubost - http://www.w3.org/People/karl/
W3C Conformance Manager, QA Activity Lead
   QA Weblog - http://www.w3.org/QA/
      *** Be Strict To Be Cool ***





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Re: Benefits of application/xhtml+xml

David Dorward-3

On Mon, 2006-04-03 at 14:14 +0900, Karl Dubost wrote:
> It's possible to use application/xhtml+xml at the development phase.  
> If the pages are invalid, there will not be displayed and/or having a  
> message showing the mistake depending on the browser.

Only if the page isn't well formed, it is possible to be invalid yet
still well formed documents:

For example, in an XHTML 1.0 Strict document:

<p>
  <spin class="shouldBeSpan">Hello</spin>, <div>world</div>
</p>

--
David Dorward                           <http://dorward.me.uk/>
"Anybody remotely interesting is mad, in some way or another."
                             -- The Greatest Show in the Galaxy

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Re: Benefits of application/xhtml+xml

Douglas Clifton
I've made this sort of argument before. You can use
a decent browser as a sort of syntax checker, or even
pass the markup through a stand-alone XML parser
(and then the W3C validator as a further step). If there
are other XHTML "lint" style applications out there,
I am unaware of them.

The problem most developers have with XHTML is in
coping with dynamic sources of content, a commenting
system for instance. If the software isn't clever enough
to strip or reform tags from such input, then it breaks
the whole page...

But I agree with Karl, it is a good sanity check.
A programmer certainly wouldn't want to distribute
software in source form if the code has syntax
errors in it!

--
Douglas Clifton
[hidden email]
http://loadaveragezero.com/
http://loadaveragezero.com/app/s9y/
http://loadaveragezero.com/drx/rss/recent

On 4/3/06, David Dorward <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> On Mon, 2006-04-03 at 14:14 +0900, Karl Dubost wrote:
> > It's possible to use application/xhtml+xml at the development phase.
> > If the pages are invalid, there will not be displayed and/or having a
> > message showing the mistake depending on the browser.
>
> Only if the page isn't well formed, it is possible to be invalid yet
> still well formed documents:
>
> For example, in an XHTML 1.0 Strict document:
>
> <p>
>   <spin class="shouldBeSpan">Hello</spin>, <div>world</div>
> </p>
>
> --
> David Dorward                           <http://dorward.me.uk/>
> "Anybody remotely interesting is mad, in some way or another."
>                              -- The Greatest Show in the Galaxy