ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close

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ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close

Dan Burnett-3
To all of you who have helped in the Voice Browser Working Group over the years,


The Voice Browser Working Group will be closing shortly, but before it does, it is appropriate to say a few words about the history and accomplishments of the WG.

The Voice Browser Working Group has been one of the longest-running and most successful working groups at W3C, both in terms of its list of specifications and its whole-hearted adoption by its target industry.

Under the leadership of Jim Larson, the group started in 1999 with a goal of taking the VoiceXML 1.0 specification created by IBM, Motorola, AT&T, and Lucent and turning it into a world-wide standard for call center Interactive Voice Response (IVR) application development.  At the time, nearly all such development was done using proprietary software running on custom hardware systems that lived in phone company Central Office buildings.  Application development took many months, and new features often took years to make their way onto the hardware platforms.  Additionally, Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR, or Voice Recognition) technology suffered from a lack of adopted standards, even though many of the APIs were similar at their core due to agreements in the research community.  This made it difficult for competition in the ASR space to flourish since each ASR engine had a custom API that IVR application developers had to use.  Meanwhile, the HTML revolution had already resulted in web-based customer self-care, so enterprises already had a direct line between their customers and their back end systems.
Enter VoiceXML.  Extending XML in the way W3C, at the time, was extending HTML, via XML elements with associated rendering semantics, VoiceXML created a uniform language for IVR development that allowed enterprises to use the web model of resource naming, caching, and fetching for easy integration with their existing back-end systems.  Simultaneously, it created a uniform way to use ASR engines, with a common lexical grammar language (SRGS), a common semantic processor language (SISR), a common speech synthesis language (SSML), a common lexicon format (PLS), and the amazing innovation of a confidence threshold value constrained to range from 0 to 100, something considered almost impossible at the time.
Most importantly, VoiceXML introduced the web model to the automated call center environment, along with its associated reductions in development cost and time and deployment cost and time. Within a few short years VoiceXML-based systems dominated the IVR industry, replacing all existing custom hardware systems on the market with racks of general compute servers as we know them today.
VoiceXML has been an unqualified success that has directly led to continued innovations such as those from the cloud IVR industry of Twilio, Tropo, and others.

During its lifetime the Voice Browser produced the following specifications:

Recommendations:
----------------
2015-09-01
State Chart XML (SCXML): State Machine Notation for Control Abstraction
http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml/

2011-07-05
Voice Browser Call Control: CCXML Version 1.0
http://www.w3.org/TR/ccxml/

2010-09-07
Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.1
http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis11/

2008-10-14
Pronunciation Lexicon Specification (PLS) Version 1.0
http://www.w3.org/TR/pronunciation-lexicon/

2007-06-19
Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 2.1
http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml21/

2007-04-05
Semantic Interpretation for Speech Recognition (SISR) Version 1.0
http://www.w3.org/TR/semantic-interpretation/

2004-09-07
Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.0
http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis

2004-03-16
Speech Recognition Grammar Specification Version 1.0
http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-grammar

2004-03-16
Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) Version 2.0
http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml20

Group Notes:
------------
2015-08-11
DOM Event I/O Processor for SCXML
http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-dom-iop/

2015-08-11
XPath Data Model for SCXML
http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-xpath-dm/

2009-12-08
Mobile Web for Social Development Roadmap
http://www.w3.org/TR/mw4d-roadmap/

2005-05-26
SSML 1.0 say-as attribute values
http://www.w3.org/TR/ssml-sayas

1998-01-28
Voice Browsers
http://www.w3.org/TR/NOTE-voice


Working Drafts:
-------------
2010-12-16
Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 3.0
http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml30/


I would personally like to thank all the members of the Voice Browser Working Group over the years, with special mention to
- Jim Barnett and his team for helping us finish SCXML, our final Recommendation,
- Kaz Ashimura for his years of dedicated work as our Team Contact, and
- Jim Larson and our recently departed friend, Scott McGlashan, for their outstanding vision and leadership.

Thank you.


Dan Burnett
Chair, Voice Browser Working Group

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Re: ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close

KARAM, GERALD  (GERALD)
Dan,

While I have watched this mostly from the sidelines, it has been an honor to have been a part of it from the genesis of VoiceXML and the watch the tremendous stewardship of the W3C VBWG and its leadership over the years.

These are still some of my proudest and most satisfying technical contributions.

Thank you to all who have given their time and creativity over so many years to the compendium of recommendations, especially to my colleagues and friends who helped create VoiceXML 1.0 and an extra thanks to you Dan for your many many contributions over the years and for this wonderful note.

Gerald Karam

Still with AT&T 😀

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 26, 2015, at 11:28 AM, Dan Burnett <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> To all of you who have helped in the Voice Browser Working Group over the years,
>
>
> The Voice Browser Working Group will be closing shortly, but before it does, it is appropriate to say a few words about the history and accomplishments of the WG.
>
> The Voice Browser Working Group has been one of the longest-running and most successful working groups at W3C, both in terms of its list of specifications and its whole-hearted adoption by its target industry.
>
> Under the leadership of Jim Larson, the group started in 1999 with a goal of taking the VoiceXML 1.0 specification created by IBM, Motorola, AT&T, and Lucent and turning it into a world-wide standard for call center Interactive Voice Response (IVR) application development.  At the time, nearly all such development was done using proprietary software running on custom hardware systems that lived in phone company Central Office buildings.  Application development took many months, and new features often took years to make their way onto the hardware platforms.  Additionally, Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR, or Voice Recognition) technology suffered from a lack of adopted standards, even though many of the APIs were similar at their core due to agreements in the research community.  This made it difficult for competition in the ASR space to flourish since each ASR engine had a custom API that IVR application developers had to use.  Meanwhile, the HTML revolution had already resulted in web-based customer self-care, so enterprises already had a direct line between their customers and their back end systems.
> Enter VoiceXML.  Extending XML in the way W3C, at the time, was extending HTML, via XML elements with associated rendering semantics, VoiceXML created a uniform language for IVR development that allowed enterprises to use the web model of resource naming, caching, and fetching for easy integration with their existing back-end systems.  Simultaneously, it created a uniform way to use ASR engines, with a common lexical grammar language (SRGS), a common semantic processor language (SISR), a common speech synthesis language (SSML), a common lexicon format (PLS), and the amazing innovation of a confidence threshold value constrained to range from 0 to 100, something considered almost impossible at the time.
> Most importantly, VoiceXML introduced the web model to the automated call center environment, along with its associated reductions in development cost and time and deployment cost and time. Within a few short years VoiceXML-based systems dominated the IVR industry, replacing all existing custom hardware systems on the market with racks of general compute servers as we know them today.
> VoiceXML has been an unqualified success that has directly led to continued innovations such as those from the cloud IVR industry of Twilio, Tropo, and others.
>
> During its lifetime the Voice Browser produced the following specifications:
>
> Recommendations:
> ----------------
> 2015-09-01
> State Chart XML (SCXML): State Machine Notation for Control Abstraction
> http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml/
>
> 2011-07-05
> Voice Browser Call Control: CCXML Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/ccxml/
>
> 2010-09-07
> Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.1
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis11/
>
> 2008-10-14
> Pronunciation Lexicon Specification (PLS) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/pronunciation-lexicon/
>
> 2007-06-19
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 2.1
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml21/
>
> 2007-04-05
> Semantic Interpretation for Speech Recognition (SISR) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/semantic-interpretation/
>
> 2004-09-07
> Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis
>
> 2004-03-16
> Speech Recognition Grammar Specification Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-grammar
>
> 2004-03-16
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) Version 2.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml20
>
> Group Notes:
> ------------
> 2015-08-11
> DOM Event I/O Processor for SCXML
> http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-dom-iop/
>
> 2015-08-11
> XPath Data Model for SCXML
> http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-xpath-dm/
>
> 2009-12-08
> Mobile Web for Social Development Roadmap
> http://www.w3.org/TR/mw4d-roadmap/
>
> 2005-05-26
> SSML 1.0 say-as attribute values
> http://www.w3.org/TR/ssml-sayas
>
> 1998-01-28
> Voice Browsers
> http://www.w3.org/TR/NOTE-voice
>
>
> Working Drafts:
> -------------
> 2010-12-16
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 3.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml30/
>
>
> I would personally like to thank all the members of the Voice Browser Working Group over the years, with special mention to
> - Jim Barnett and his team for helping us finish SCXML, our final Recommendation,
> - Kaz Ashimura for his years of dedicated work as our Team Contact, and
> - Jim Larson and our recently departed friend, Scott McGlashan, for their outstanding vision and leadership.
>
> Thank you.
>
>
> Dan Burnett
> Chair, Voice Browser Working Group
>
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RE: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close

Baggia, Paolo
In reply to this post by Dan Burnett-3
Dan / all,

Reading that is a bit of a shock to whom, including me, have attended some many conf calls, f2f meetings and TPACs.

I joined the WG in 2000/01 and I met there Jim and many of you. I was already acquainted with Scott from the previous EU project SUNDIAL, what a loss not having him with us now.

The Voice Browser was a great place where starting to work on standards, with some many sort of discussions, fights, but then lots of scribbling during the dinners to seek for a solution. I would like to thanks all those people, from the early 2000 until now. I think close to 100, or little less. A sort of a big family and a true cross-road of technology and friendship.

Thanks to you and all the people who chaired the group, all the authors and co-authors, all the IR people and W3C close groups (Richard Ishida, the WAIs, etc). I won't forget Debbie who contributed in VBWG and chaired MMIWG. Last but not least Kaz, DaveR, Felix, Philip and other from the W3C.

We did a great work all together.

Paolo Baggia,
Nuance (and formerly Loquendo)
-----Original Message-----
From: Dan Burnett [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: sabato 26 settembre 2015 17:26
To: [hidden email] (group); Voice Public List
Subject: ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close

To all of you who have helped in the Voice Browser Working Group over the years,


The Voice Browser Working Group will be closing shortly, but before it does, it is appropriate to say a few words about the history and accomplishments of the WG.

The Voice Browser Working Group has been one of the longest-running and most successful working groups at W3C, both in terms of its list of specifications and its whole-hearted adoption by its target industry.

Under the leadership of Jim Larson, the group started in 1999 with a goal of taking the VoiceXML 1.0 specification created by IBM, Motorola, AT&T, and Lucent and turning it into a world-wide standard for call center Interactive Voice Response (IVR) application development.  At the time, nearly all such development was done using proprietary software running on custom hardware systems that lived in phone company Central Office buildings.  Application development took many months, and new features often took years to make their way onto the hardware platforms.  Additionally, Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR, or Voice Recognition) technology suffered from a lack of adopted standards, even though many of the APIs were similar at their core due to agreements in the research community.  This made it difficult for competition in the ASR space to flourish since each ASR engine had a custom API that IVR application developers had to use.  Meanwhile, the HTML revolution had already resulted in web-based customer self-care, so enterprises already had a direct line between their customers and their back end systems.
Enter VoiceXML.  Extending XML in the way W3C, at the time, was extending HTML, via XML elements with associated rendering semantics, VoiceXML created a uniform language for IVR development that allowed enterprises to use the web model of resource naming, caching, and fetching for easy integration with their existing back-end systems.  Simultaneously, it created a uniform way to use ASR engines, with a common lexical grammar language (SRGS), a common semantic processor language (SISR), a common speech synthesis language (SSML), a common lexicon format (PLS), and the amazing innovation of a confidence threshold value constrained to range from 0 to 100, something considered almost impossible at the time.
Most importantly, VoiceXML introduced the web model to the automated call center environment, along with its associated reductions in development cost and time and deployment cost and time. Within a few short years VoiceXML-based systems dominated the IVR industry, replacing all existing custom hardware systems on the market with racks of general compute servers as we know them today.
VoiceXML has been an unqualified success that has directly led to continued innovations such as those from the cloud IVR industry of Twilio, Tropo, and others.

During its lifetime the Voice Browser produced the following specifications:

Recommendations:
----------------
2015-09-01
State Chart XML (SCXML): State Machine Notation for Control Abstraction http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml/

2011-07-05
Voice Browser Call Control: CCXML Version 1.0 http://www.w3.org/TR/ccxml/

2010-09-07
Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.1 http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis11/

2008-10-14
Pronunciation Lexicon Specification (PLS) Version 1.0 http://www.w3.org/TR/pronunciation-lexicon/

2007-06-19
Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 2.1 http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml21/

2007-04-05
Semantic Interpretation for Speech Recognition (SISR) Version 1.0 http://www.w3.org/TR/semantic-interpretation/

2004-09-07
Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.0 http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis

2004-03-16
Speech Recognition Grammar Specification Version 1.0 http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-grammar

2004-03-16
Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) Version 2.0
http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml20

Group Notes:
------------
2015-08-11
DOM Event I/O Processor for SCXML
http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-dom-iop/

2015-08-11
XPath Data Model for SCXML
http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-xpath-dm/

2009-12-08
Mobile Web for Social Development Roadmap http://www.w3.org/TR/mw4d-roadmap/

2005-05-26
SSML 1.0 say-as attribute values
http://www.w3.org/TR/ssml-sayas

1998-01-28
Voice Browsers
http://www.w3.org/TR/NOTE-voice


Working Drafts:
-------------
2010-12-16
Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 3.0 http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml30/


I would personally like to thank all the members of the Voice Browser Working Group over the years, with special mention to
- Jim Barnett and his team for helping us finish SCXML, our final Recommendation,
- Kaz Ashimura for his years of dedicated work as our Team Contact, and
- Jim Larson and our recently departed friend, Scott McGlashan, for their outstanding vision and leadership.

Thank you.


Dan Burnett
Chair, Voice Browser Working Group



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Re: ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close REUNION?

Jim Larson
In reply to this post by Dan Burnett-3
Thanks so much for participating in one of the most successful W3C
working groups.  We achieved much, had meetings at interesting places,
and had great times.  Thank you.

Let me know if you would like to get together for a WBWG reunion at
SpeechTEK, May 23-25 in Washington DC, by indicating your availability
at one or more of these dates/times:

Sunday evening May 22
Monday lunch May 23
Monday evening May 23
Tuesday lunch May 24
Tuesday evening May 24
Wednesday lunch May 25
Wednesday evening May 25

-Jim



On 9/26/2015 8:26 AM, Dan Burnett wrote:

> To all of you who have helped in the Voice Browser Working Group over the years,
>
>
> The Voice Browser Working Group will be closing shortly, but before it does, it is appropriate to say a few words about the history and accomplishments of the WG.
>
> The Voice Browser Working Group has been one of the longest-running and most successful working groups at W3C, both in terms of its list of specifications and its whole-hearted adoption by its target industry.
>
> Under the leadership of Jim Larson, the group started in 1999 with a goal of taking the VoiceXML 1.0 specification created by IBM, Motorola, AT&T, and Lucent and turning it into a world-wide standard for call center Interactive Voice Response (IVR) application development.  At the time, nearly all such development was done using proprietary software running on custom hardware systems that lived in phone company Central Office buildings.  Application development took many months, and new features often took years to make their way onto the hardware platforms.  Additionally, Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR, or Voice Recognition) technology suffered from a lack of adopted standards, even though many of the APIs were similar at their core due to agreements in the research community.  This made it difficult for competition in the ASR space to flourish since each ASR engine had a custom API that IVR application developers had to use.  Meanwhile, the HTML revolution had already resulted in web-based customer self-care, so enterprises already had a direct line between their customers and their back end systems.
> Enter VoiceXML.  Extending XML in the way W3C, at the time, was extending HTML, via XML elements with associated rendering semantics, VoiceXML created a uniform language for IVR development that allowed enterprises to use the web model of resource naming, caching, and fetching for easy integration with their existing back-end systems.  Simultaneously, it created a uniform way to use ASR engines, with a common lexical grammar language (SRGS), a common semantic processor language (SISR), a common speech synthesis language (SSML), a common lexicon format (PLS), and the amazing innovation of a confidence threshold value constrained to range from 0 to 100, something considered almost impossible at the time.
> Most importantly, VoiceXML introduced the web model to the automated call center environment, along with its associated reductions in development cost and time and deployment cost and time. Within a few short years VoiceXML-based systems dominated the IVR industry, replacing all existing custom hardware systems on the market with racks of general compute servers as we know them today.
> VoiceXML has been an unqualified success that has directly led to continued innovations such as those from the cloud IVR industry of Twilio, Tropo, and others.
>
> During its lifetime the Voice Browser produced the following specifications:
>
> Recommendations:
> ----------------
> 2015-09-01
> State Chart XML (SCXML): State Machine Notation for Control Abstraction
> http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml/
>
> 2011-07-05
> Voice Browser Call Control: CCXML Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/ccxml/
>
> 2010-09-07
> Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.1
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis11/
>
> 2008-10-14
> Pronunciation Lexicon Specification (PLS) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/pronunciation-lexicon/
>
> 2007-06-19
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 2.1
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml21/
>
> 2007-04-05
> Semantic Interpretation for Speech Recognition (SISR) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/semantic-interpretation/
>
> 2004-09-07
> Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis
>
> 2004-03-16
> Speech Recognition Grammar Specification Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-grammar
>
> 2004-03-16
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) Version 2.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml20
>
> Group Notes:
> ------------
> 2015-08-11
> DOM Event I/O Processor for SCXML
> http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-dom-iop/
>
> 2015-08-11
> XPath Data Model for SCXML
> http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-xpath-dm/
>
> 2009-12-08
> Mobile Web for Social Development Roadmap
> http://www.w3.org/TR/mw4d-roadmap/
>
> 2005-05-26
> SSML 1.0 say-as attribute values
> http://www.w3.org/TR/ssml-sayas
>
> 1998-01-28
> Voice Browsers
> http://www.w3.org/TR/NOTE-voice
>
>
> Working Drafts:
> -------------
> 2010-12-16
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 3.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml30/
>
>
> I would personally like to thank all the members of the Voice Browser Working Group over the years, with special mention to
> - Jim Barnett and his team for helping us finish SCXML, our final Recommendation,
> - Kaz Ashimura for his years of dedicated work as our Team Contact, and
> - Jim Larson and our recently departed friend, Scott McGlashan, for their outstanding vision and leadership.
>
> Thank you.
>
>
> Dan Burnett
> Chair, Voice Browser Working Group
>




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RE: ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close REUNION?

Deborah Dahl
Dear Dan,
Thank you for your note and the summary of the VBWG's history and
specifications. The list of specifications that the group published is
indeed impressive, but it's even more impressive when you know, as the VBWG
members well know, how each feature of each specification was thought
through, debated, revised, wordsmithed, and tested before it became part of
the standard. The specifications look on the surface like a dry list of
MUST's and SHOULD's but that appearance doesn't do justice to the long
discussions and late nights in far-flung places that led to their creation.
All of this hard work and care resulted in an incredible suite of standards
that laid the foundation for a whole industry. I only wish Scott were still
with us today to share these final thoughts.
Jim, that's a wonderful idea to get together at SpeechTEK. I would love to
do that.
best,
Debbie

-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Larson [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, September 28, 2015 11:24 AM
To: Dan Burnett; [hidden email] (group); Voice Public List
Subject: Re: ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close REUNION?

Thanks so much for participating in one of the most successful W3C working
groups.  We achieved much, had meetings at interesting places, and had great
times.  Thank you.

Let me know if you would like to get together for a WBWG reunion at
SpeechTEK, May 23-25 in Washington DC, by indicating your availability at
one or more of these dates/times:

Sunday evening May 22
Monday lunch May 23
Monday evening May 23
Tuesday lunch May 24
Tuesday evening May 24
Wednesday lunch May 25
Wednesday evening May 25

-Jim



On 9/26/2015 8:26 AM, Dan Burnett wrote:
> To all of you who have helped in the Voice Browser Working Group over
> the years,
>
>
> The Voice Browser Working Group will be closing shortly, but before it
does, it is appropriate to say a few words about the history and
accomplishments of the WG.
>
> The Voice Browser Working Group has been one of the longest-running and
most successful working groups at W3C, both in terms of its list of
specifications and its whole-hearted adoption by its target industry.
>
> Under the leadership of Jim Larson, the group started in 1999 with a goal
of taking the VoiceXML 1.0 specification created by IBM, Motorola, AT&T, and
Lucent and turning it into a world-wide standard for call center Interactive
Voice Response (IVR) application development.  At the time, nearly all such
development was done using proprietary software running on custom hardware
systems that lived in phone company Central Office buildings.  Application
development took many months, and new features often took years to make
their way onto the hardware platforms.  Additionally, Automatic Speech
Recognition (ASR, or Voice Recognition) technology suffered from a lack of
adopted standards, even though many of the APIs were similar at their core
due to agreements in the research community.  This made it difficult for
competition in the ASR space to flourish since each ASR engine had a custom
API that IVR application developers had to use.  Meanwhile, the HTML
revolution had already resulted in web-based customer self-care, so
enterprises already had a direct line between their customers and their back
end systems.
> Enter VoiceXML.  Extending XML in the way W3C, at the time, was extending
HTML, via XML elements with associated rendering semantics, VoiceXML created
a uniform language for IVR development that allowed enterprises to use the
web model of resource naming, caching, and fetching for easy integration
with their existing back-end systems.  Simultaneously, it created a uniform
way to use ASR engines, with a common lexical grammar language (SRGS), a
common semantic processor language (SISR), a common speech synthesis
language (SSML), a common lexicon format (PLS), and the amazing innovation
of a confidence threshold value constrained to range from 0 to 100,
something considered almost impossible at the time.
> Most importantly, VoiceXML introduced the web model to the automated call
center environment, along with its associated reductions in development cost
and time and deployment cost and time. Within a few short years
VoiceXML-based systems dominated the IVR industry, replacing all existing
custom hardware systems on the market with racks of general compute servers
as we know them today.
> VoiceXML has been an unqualified success that has directly led to
continued innovations such as those from the cloud IVR industry of Twilio,
Tropo, and others.
>
> During its lifetime the Voice Browser produced the following
specifications:

>
> Recommendations:
> ----------------
> 2015-09-01
> State Chart XML (SCXML): State Machine Notation for Control
> Abstraction http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml/
>
> 2011-07-05
> Voice Browser Call Control: CCXML Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/ccxml/
>
> 2010-09-07
> Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.1
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis11/
>
> 2008-10-14
> Pronunciation Lexicon Specification (PLS) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/pronunciation-lexicon/
>
> 2007-06-19
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 2.1
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml21/
>
> 2007-04-05
> Semantic Interpretation for Speech Recognition (SISR) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/semantic-interpretation/
>
> 2004-09-07
> Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis
>
> 2004-03-16
> Speech Recognition Grammar Specification Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-grammar
>
> 2004-03-16
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) Version 2.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml20
>
> Group Notes:
> ------------
> 2015-08-11
> DOM Event I/O Processor for SCXML
> http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-dom-iop/
>
> 2015-08-11
> XPath Data Model for SCXML
> http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-xpath-dm/
>
> 2009-12-08
> Mobile Web for Social Development Roadmap
> http://www.w3.org/TR/mw4d-roadmap/
>
> 2005-05-26
> SSML 1.0 say-as attribute values
> http://www.w3.org/TR/ssml-sayas
>
> 1998-01-28
> Voice Browsers
> http://www.w3.org/TR/NOTE-voice
>
>
> Working Drafts:
> -------------
> 2010-12-16
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 3.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml30/
>
>
> I would personally like to thank all the members of the Voice Browser
> Working Group over the years, with special mention to
> - Jim Barnett and his team for helping us finish SCXML, our final
> Recommendation,
> - Kaz Ashimura for his years of dedicated work as our Team Contact,
> and
> - Jim Larson and our recently departed friend, Scott McGlashan, for their
outstanding vision and leadership.
>
> Thank you.
>
>
> Dan Burnett
> Chair, Voice Browser Working Group
>






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|

RE: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close

Michael Bodell-2
In reply to this post by Dan Burnett-3
Thank you to Dan and Jim and Scott for co-chairing the group over time, and to our various editors in chief - Jim Barnett, RJ Auburn, Dan Burnett, 双志伟, Paolo Baggia, Matt Oshry, Luc Van Tichelen, Andrew Hunt, Scott McGlashan - and to all of the various participants.

The 9 specifications and numerous notes transformed the IVR industry, but also positively brought speech standards to the wider visual and multimodal web.  These standards still positively impact many millions of people (if not more) each day.  

In addition to the impressive voice standards and working group notes written below, the Voice Browser also gave birth to the ideas behind the CORS (Cross-Origin Resource Sharing) specification, which is now a critical part of the wider web standards (The Voice Browser Working Group note http://www.w3.org/TR/2005/NOTE-access-control-20050613/ has evolved over time to a full W3C Rec with wide implementation in http://www.w3.org/TR/access-control/).

May everyone continue to have success in their future work.

-----Original Message-----
From: Dan Burnett [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Saturday, September 26, 2015 8:26 AM
To: [hidden email] (group); Voice Public List
Subject: ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close

To all of you who have helped in the Voice Browser Working Group over the years,


The Voice Browser Working Group will be closing shortly, but before it does, it is appropriate to say a few words about the history and accomplishments of the WG.

The Voice Browser Working Group has been one of the longest-running and most successful working groups at W3C, both in terms of its list of specifications and its whole-hearted adoption by its target industry.

Under the leadership of Jim Larson, the group started in 1999 with a goal of taking the VoiceXML 1.0 specification created by IBM, Motorola, AT&T, and Lucent and turning it into a world-wide standard for call center Interactive Voice Response (IVR) application development.  At the time, nearly all such development was done using proprietary software running on custom hardware systems that lived in phone company Central Office buildings.  Application development took many months, and new features often took years to make their way onto the hardware platforms.  Additionally, Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR, or Voice Recognition) technology suffered from a lack of adopted standards, even though many of the APIs were similar at their core due to agreements in the research community.  This made it difficult for competition in the ASR space to flourish since each ASR engine had a custom API that IVR application developers had to use.  Meanwhile, the HTML revolution had already resulted in web-based customer self-care, so enterprises already had a direct line between their customers and their back end systems.
Enter VoiceXML.  Extending XML in the way W3C, at the time, was extending HTML, via XML elements with associated rendering semantics, VoiceXML created a uniform language for IVR development that allowed enterprises to use the web model of resource naming, caching, and fetching for easy integration with their existing back-end systems.  Simultaneously, it created a uniform way to use ASR engines, with a common lexical grammar language (SRGS), a common semantic processor language (SISR), a common speech synthesis language (SSML), a common lexicon format (PLS), and the amazing innovation of a confidence threshold value constrained to range from 0 to 100, something considered almost impossible at the time.
Most importantly, VoiceXML introduced the web model to the automated call center environment, along with its associated reductions in development cost and time and deployment cost and time. Within a few short years VoiceXML-based systems dominated the IVR industry, replacing all existing custom hardware systems on the market with racks of general compute servers as we know them today.
VoiceXML has been an unqualified success that has directly led to continued innovations such as those from the cloud IVR industry of Twilio, Tropo, and others.

During its lifetime the Voice Browser produced the following specifications:

Recommendations:
----------------
2015-09-01
State Chart XML (SCXML): State Machine Notation for Control Abstraction http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml/

2011-07-05
Voice Browser Call Control: CCXML Version 1.0 http://www.w3.org/TR/ccxml/

2010-09-07
Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.1 http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis11/

2008-10-14
Pronunciation Lexicon Specification (PLS) Version 1.0 http://www.w3.org/TR/pronunciation-lexicon/

2007-06-19
Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 2.1 http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml21/

2007-04-05
Semantic Interpretation for Speech Recognition (SISR) Version 1.0 http://www.w3.org/TR/semantic-interpretation/

2004-09-07
Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.0 http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis

2004-03-16
Speech Recognition Grammar Specification Version 1.0 http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-grammar

2004-03-16
Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) Version 2.0
http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml20

Group Notes:
------------
2015-08-11
DOM Event I/O Processor for SCXML
http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-dom-iop/

2015-08-11
XPath Data Model for SCXML
http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-xpath-dm/

2009-12-08
Mobile Web for Social Development Roadmap http://www.w3.org/TR/mw4d-roadmap/

2005-05-26
SSML 1.0 say-as attribute values
http://www.w3.org/TR/ssml-sayas

1998-01-28
Voice Browsers
http://www.w3.org/TR/NOTE-voice


Working Drafts:
-------------
2010-12-16
Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 3.0 http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml30/


I would personally like to thank all the members of the Voice Browser Working Group over the years, with special mention to
- Jim Barnett and his team for helping us finish SCXML, our final Recommendation,
- Kaz Ashimura for his years of dedicated work as our Team Contact, and
- Jim Larson and our recently departed friend, Scott McGlashan, for their outstanding vision and leadership.

Thank you.


Dan Burnett
Chair, Voice Browser Working Group

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Re: ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close REUNION?

Kazuyuki Ashimura
In reply to this post by Deborah Dahl
Hi Dan, Jim Larson, Jim Barnett, Debbie and all,

I really appreciate all the great contribution made by the group
to the standardization of voice technologies, and am proud that
I could be a part of the work.

By the way, as you know, the group is closing, and that means
the VBWG mailing lists (both the Member list and the public list)
will be also closed.

So I think maybe it would make sense to have another ML for
the VBWG alumni to continue some more discussion, e.g, on
the possible reunion at SpeechTEK.

What d you think?

Maybe the ML could be a public one.

Thanks,

Kazuyuki



On Tue, Sep 29, 2015 at 3:00 AM, Deborah Dahl <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Dan,
Thank you for your note and the summary of the VBWG's history and
specifications. The list of specifications that the group published is
indeed impressive, but it's even more impressive when you know, as the VBWG
members well know, how each feature of each specification was thought
through, debated, revised, wordsmithed, and tested before it became part of
the standard. The specifications look on the surface like a dry list of
MUST's and SHOULD's but that appearance doesn't do justice to the long
discussions and late nights in far-flung places that led to their creation.
All of this hard work and care resulted in an incredible suite of standards
that laid the foundation for a whole industry. I only wish Scott were still
with us today to share these final thoughts.
Jim, that's a wonderful idea to get together at SpeechTEK. I would love to
do that.
best,
Debbie

-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Larson [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, September 28, 2015 11:24 AM
To: Dan Burnett; [hidden email] (group); Voice Public List
Subject: Re: ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close REUNION?

Thanks so much for participating in one of the most successful W3C working
groups.  We achieved much, had meetings at interesting places, and had great
times.  Thank you.

Let me know if you would like to get together for a WBWG reunion at
SpeechTEK, May 23-25 in Washington DC, by indicating your availability at
one or more of these dates/times:

Sunday evening May 22
Monday lunch May 23
Monday evening May 23
Tuesday lunch May 24
Tuesday evening May 24
Wednesday lunch May 25
Wednesday evening May 25

-Jim



On 9/26/2015 8:26 AM, Dan Burnett wrote:
> To all of you who have helped in the Voice Browser Working Group over
> the years,
>
>
> The Voice Browser Working Group will be closing shortly, but before it
does, it is appropriate to say a few words about the history and
accomplishments of the WG.
>
> The Voice Browser Working Group has been one of the longest-running and
most successful working groups at W3C, both in terms of its list of
specifications and its whole-hearted adoption by its target industry.
>
> Under the leadership of Jim Larson, the group started in 1999 with a goal
of taking the VoiceXML 1.0 specification created by IBM, Motorola, AT&T, and
Lucent and turning it into a world-wide standard for call center Interactive
Voice Response (IVR) application development.  At the time, nearly all such
development was done using proprietary software running on custom hardware
systems that lived in phone company Central Office buildings.  Application
development took many months, and new features often took years to make
their way onto the hardware platforms.  Additionally, Automatic Speech
Recognition (ASR, or Voice Recognition) technology suffered from a lack of
adopted standards, even though many of the APIs were similar at their core
due to agreements in the research community.  This made it difficult for
competition in the ASR space to flourish since each ASR engine had a custom
API that IVR application developers had to use.  Meanwhile, the HTML
revolution had already resulted in web-based customer self-care, so
enterprises already had a direct line between their customers and their back
end systems.
> Enter VoiceXML.  Extending XML in the way W3C, at the time, was extending
HTML, via XML elements with associated rendering semantics, VoiceXML created
a uniform language for IVR development that allowed enterprises to use the
web model of resource naming, caching, and fetching for easy integration
with their existing back-end systems.  Simultaneously, it created a uniform
way to use ASR engines, with a common lexical grammar language (SRGS), a
common semantic processor language (SISR), a common speech synthesis
language (SSML), a common lexicon format (PLS), and the amazing innovation
of a confidence threshold value constrained to range from 0 to 100,
something considered almost impossible at the time.
> Most importantly, VoiceXML introduced the web model to the automated call
center environment, along with its associated reductions in development cost
and time and deployment cost and time. Within a few short years
VoiceXML-based systems dominated the IVR industry, replacing all existing
custom hardware systems on the market with racks of general compute servers
as we know them today.
> VoiceXML has been an unqualified success that has directly led to
continued innovations such as those from the cloud IVR industry of Twilio,
Tropo, and others.
>
> During its lifetime the Voice Browser produced the following
specifications:
>
> Recommendations:
> ----------------
> 2015-09-01
> State Chart XML (SCXML): State Machine Notation for Control
> Abstraction http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml/
>
> 2011-07-05
> Voice Browser Call Control: CCXML Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/ccxml/
>
> 2010-09-07
> Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.1
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis11/
>
> 2008-10-14
> Pronunciation Lexicon Specification (PLS) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/pronunciation-lexicon/
>
> 2007-06-19
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 2.1
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml21/
>
> 2007-04-05
> Semantic Interpretation for Speech Recognition (SISR) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/semantic-interpretation/
>
> 2004-09-07
> Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis
>
> 2004-03-16
> Speech Recognition Grammar Specification Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-grammar
>
> 2004-03-16
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) Version 2.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml20
>
> Group Notes:
> ------------
> 2015-08-11
> DOM Event I/O Processor for SCXML
> http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-dom-iop/
>
> 2015-08-11
> XPath Data Model for SCXML
> http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-xpath-dm/
>
> 2009-12-08
> Mobile Web for Social Development Roadmap
> http://www.w3.org/TR/mw4d-roadmap/
>
> 2005-05-26
> SSML 1.0 say-as attribute values
> http://www.w3.org/TR/ssml-sayas
>
> 1998-01-28
> Voice Browsers
> http://www.w3.org/TR/NOTE-voice
>
>
> Working Drafts:
> -------------
> 2010-12-16
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 3.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml30/
>
>
> I would personally like to thank all the members of the Voice Browser
> Working Group over the years, with special mention to
> - Jim Barnett and his team for helping us finish SCXML, our final
> Recommendation,
> - Kaz Ashimura for his years of dedicated work as our Team Contact,
> and
> - Jim Larson and our recently departed friend, Scott McGlashan, for their
outstanding vision and leadership.
>
> Thank you.
>
>
> Dan Burnett
> Chair, Voice Browser Working Group
>









--
Kaz Ashimura, W3C Staff Contact for Auto, WoT, TV, MMI, Voice and Geo
Tel: +81 3 3516 2504

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RE: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close

Brad Porter-3
In reply to this post by Michael Bodell-2
I have been away from the group for a long time, but have great admiration for all you have accomplished.  What I enjoyed most about my time on the Working Group was how deep and lasting friendships formed through the camaraderie of trying to solve challenging technical problems by consensus.  Jim, Dan and Scott navigated the challenges of building consensus among such a large group with patience, kindness and periodic doses of tough love at just the right times.  

I'll never forget debating markup in the Soviet military headquarters building in Prague while Jim sat on the table to make Gadi stop talking, or Dan returning his steak 4 times in France because the French were unwilling to cook it through, or helping TV Raman navigate the cobblestones of Budapest to find a Greek meal, or sharing a drink with Scott in awe of the fact that Sweden runs fiber to most homes, or trying to comprehend that 2,000 Lira equaled one dollar in Italy, or simply sipping orange juice on the patio of the Sofitel in Cannes looking out over the Mediterranean.    

You all expanded my understanding of both the world of technology and the world in general in a way I can only hope to pay forward some day.  

Cheers,
Brad
-----Original Message-----
Thank you to Dan and Jim and Scott for co-chairing the group over time, and to our various editors in chief - Jim Barnett, RJ Auburn, Dan Burnett, 双志伟, Paolo Baggia, Matt Oshry, Luc Van Tichelen, Andrew Hunt, Scott McGlashan - and to all of the various participants.

The 9 specifications and numerous notes transformed the IVR industry, but also positively brought speech standards to the wider visual and multimodal web.  These standards still positively impact many millions of people (if not more) each day.  

In addition to the impressive voice standards and working group notes written below, the Voice Browser also gave birth to the ideas behind the CORS (Cross-Origin Resource Sharing) specification, which is now a critical part of the wider web standards (The Voice Browser Working Group note http://www.w3.org/TR/2005/NOTE-access-control-20050613/ has evolved over time to a full W3C Rec with wide implementation in http://www.w3.org/TR/access-control/).

May everyone continue to have success in their future work.

-----Original Message-----
From: Dan Burnett [mailto:[hidden email]] 
Sent: Saturday, September 26, 2015 8:26 AM
To: [hidden email] (group); Voice Public List
Subject: ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close

To all of you who have helped in the Voice Browser Working Group over the years,


The Voice Browser Working Group will be closing shortly, but before it does, it is appropriate to say a few words about the history and accomplishments of the WG.

The Voice Browser Working Group has been one of the longest-running and most successful working groups at W3C, both in terms of its list of specifications and its whole-hearted adoption by its target industry.

Under the leadership of Jim Larson, the group started in 1999 with a goal of taking the VoiceXML 1.0 specification created by IBM, Motorola, AT&T, and Lucent and turning it into a world-wide standard for call center Interactive Voice Response (IVR) application development.  At the time, nearly all such development was done using proprietary software running on custom hardware systems that lived in phone company Central Office buildings.  Application development took many months, and new features often took years to make their way onto the hardware platforms.  Additionally, Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR, or Voice Recognition) technology suffered from a lack of adopted standards, even though many of the APIs were similar at their core due to agreements in the research community.  This made it difficult for competition in the ASR space to flourish since each ASR engine had a custom API that IVR application developers had to use.  Meanwhile, the HTML revolution had already resulted in web-based customer self-care, so enterprises already had a direct line between their customers and their back end systems..
Enter VoiceXML.  Extending XML in the way W3C, at the time, was extending HTML, via XML elements with associated rendering semantics, VoiceXML created a uniform language for IVR development that allowed enterprises to use the web model of resource naming, caching, and fetching for easy integration with their existing back-end systems.  Simultaneously, it created a uniform way to use ASR engines, with a common lexical grammar language (SRGS), a common semantic processor language (SISR), a common speech synthesis language (SSML), a common lexicon format (PLS), and the amazing innovation of a confidence threshold value constrained to range from 0 to 100, something considered almost impossible at the time.
Most importantly, VoiceXML introduced the web model to the automated call center environment, along with its associated reductions in development cost and time and deployment cost and time. Within a few short years VoiceXML-based systems dominated the IVR industry, replacing all existing custom hardware systems on the market with racks of general compute servers as we know them today.
VoiceXML has been an unqualified success that has directly led to continued innovations such as those from the cloud IVR industry of Twilio, Tropo, and others.

During its lifetime the Voice Browser produced the following specifications:

Recommendations:
----------------
2015-09-01
State Chart XML (SCXML): State Machine Notation for Control Abstraction http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml/


2011-07-05
Voice Browser Call Control: CCXML Version 1.0 http://www..w3.org/TR/ccxml/


2010-09-07
Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.1 http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis11/


2008-10-14
Pronunciation Lexicon Specification (PLS) Version 1.0 http://www.w3.org/TR/pronunciation-lexicon/


2007-06-19
Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 2.1 http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml21/


2007-04-05
Semantic Interpretation for Speech Recognition (SISR) Version 1.0 http://www.w3.org/TR/semantic-interpretation/


2004-09-07
Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.0 http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis


2004-03-16
Speech Recognition Grammar Specification Version 1.0 http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-grammar


2004-03-16
Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) Version 2.0
http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml20


Group Notes:
------------
2015-08-11
DOM Event I/O Processor for SCXML
http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-dom-iop/


2015-08-11
XPath Data Model for SCXML
http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-xpath-dm/


2009-12-08
Mobile Web for Social Development Roadmap http://www.w3.org/TR/mw4d-roadmap/


2005-05-26
SSML 1.0 say-as attribute values
http://www.w3.org/TR/ssml-sayas


1998-01-28
Voice Browsers
http://www.w3.org/TR/NOTE-voice



Working Drafts:
-------------
2010-12-16
Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 3.0 http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml30/



I would personally like to thank all the members of the Voice Browser Working Group over the years, with special mention to
- Jim Barnett and his team for helping us finish SCXML, our final Recommendation,
- Kaz Ashimura for his years of dedicated work as our Team Contact, and
- Jim Larson and our recently departed friend, Scott McGlashan, for their outstanding vision and leadership.

Thank you.


Dan Burnett
Chair, Voice Browser Working Group
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|

Re: ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close REUNION?

Jim Larson
In reply to this post by Kazuyuki Ashimura
Kazuyuki,

I think this is a great idea, would you be willing to build a public mailing list?

Regards,

-Jim

On 9/28/2015 9:17 PM, Kazuyuki Ashimura wrote:
Hi Dan, Jim Larson, Jim Barnett, Debbie and all,

I really appreciate all the great contribution made by the group
to the standardization of voice technologies, and am proud that
I could be a part of the work.

By the way, as you know, the group is closing, and that means
the VBWG mailing lists (both the Member list and the public list)
will be also closed.

So I think maybe it would make sense to have another ML for
the VBWG alumni to continue some more discussion, e.g, on
the possible reunion at SpeechTEK.

What d you think?

Maybe the ML could be a public one.

Thanks,

Kazuyuki



On Tue, Sep 29, 2015 at 3:00 AM, Deborah Dahl <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Dan,
Thank you for your note and the summary of the VBWG's history and
specifications. The list of specifications that the group published is
indeed impressive, but it's even more impressive when you know, as the VBWG
members well know, how each feature of each specification was thought
through, debated, revised, wordsmithed, and tested before it became part of
the standard. The specifications look on the surface like a dry list of
MUST's and SHOULD's but that appearance doesn't do justice to the long
discussions and late nights in far-flung places that led to their creation.
All of this hard work and care resulted in an incredible suite of standards
that laid the foundation for a whole industry. I only wish Scott were still
with us today to share these final thoughts.
Jim, that's a wonderful idea to get together at SpeechTEK. I would love to
do that.
best,
Debbie

-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Larson [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, September 28, 2015 11:24 AM
To: Dan Burnett; [hidden email] (group); Voice Public List
Subject: Re: ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close REUNION?

Thanks so much for participating in one of the most successful W3C working
groups.  We achieved much, had meetings at interesting places, and had great
times.  Thank you.

Let me know if you would like to get together for a WBWG reunion at
SpeechTEK, May 23-25 in Washington DC, by indicating your availability at
one or more of these dates/times:

Sunday evening May 22
Monday lunch May 23
Monday evening May 23
Tuesday lunch May 24
Tuesday evening May 24
Wednesday lunch May 25
Wednesday evening May 25

-Jim



On 9/26/2015 8:26 AM, Dan Burnett wrote:
> To all of you who have helped in the Voice Browser Working Group over
> the years,
>
>
> The Voice Browser Working Group will be closing shortly, but before it
does, it is appropriate to say a few words about the history and
accomplishments of the WG.
>
> The Voice Browser Working Group has been one of the longest-running and
most successful working groups at W3C, both in terms of its list of
specifications and its whole-hearted adoption by its target industry.
>
> Under the leadership of Jim Larson, the group started in 1999 with a goal
of taking the VoiceXML 1.0 specification created by IBM, Motorola, AT&T, and
Lucent and turning it into a world-wide standard for call center Interactive
Voice Response (IVR) application development.  At the time, nearly all such
development was done using proprietary software running on custom hardware
systems that lived in phone company Central Office buildings.  Application
development took many months, and new features often took years to make
their way onto the hardware platforms.  Additionally, Automatic Speech
Recognition (ASR, or Voice Recognition) technology suffered from a lack of
adopted standards, even though many of the APIs were similar at their core
due to agreements in the research community.  This made it difficult for
competition in the ASR space to flourish since each ASR engine had a custom
API that IVR application developers had to use.  Meanwhile, the HTML
revolution had already resulted in web-based customer self-care, so
enterprises already had a direct line between their customers and their back
end systems.
> Enter VoiceXML.  Extending XML in the way W3C, at the time, was extending
HTML, via XML elements with associated rendering semantics, VoiceXML created
a uniform language for IVR development that allowed enterprises to use the
web model of resource naming, caching, and fetching for easy integration
with their existing back-end systems.  Simultaneously, it created a uniform
way to use ASR engines, with a common lexical grammar language (SRGS), a
common semantic processor language (SISR), a common speech synthesis
language (SSML), a common lexicon format (PLS), and the amazing innovation
of a confidence threshold value constrained to range from 0 to 100,
something considered almost impossible at the time.
> Most importantly, VoiceXML introduced the web model to the automated call
center environment, along with its associated reductions in development cost
and time and deployment cost and time. Within a few short years
VoiceXML-based systems dominated the IVR industry, replacing all existing
custom hardware systems on the market with racks of general compute servers
as we know them today.
> VoiceXML has been an unqualified success that has directly led to
continued innovations such as those from the cloud IVR industry of Twilio,
Tropo, and others.
>
> During its lifetime the Voice Browser produced the following
specifications:
>
> Recommendations:
> ----------------
> 2015-09-01
> State Chart XML (SCXML): State Machine Notation for Control
> Abstraction http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml/
>
> 2011-07-05
> Voice Browser Call Control: CCXML Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/ccxml/
>
> 2010-09-07
> Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.1
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis11/
>
> 2008-10-14
> Pronunciation Lexicon Specification (PLS) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/pronunciation-lexicon/
>
> 2007-06-19
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 2.1
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml21/
>
> 2007-04-05
> Semantic Interpretation for Speech Recognition (SISR) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/semantic-interpretation/
>
> 2004-09-07
> Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis
>
> 2004-03-16
> Speech Recognition Grammar Specification Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-grammar
>
> 2004-03-16
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) Version 2.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml20
>
> Group Notes:
> ------------
> 2015-08-11
> DOM Event I/O Processor for SCXML
> http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-dom-iop/
>
> 2015-08-11
> XPath Data Model for SCXML
> http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-xpath-dm/
>
> 2009-12-08
> Mobile Web for Social Development Roadmap
> http://www.w3.org/TR/mw4d-roadmap/
>
> 2005-05-26
> SSML 1.0 say-as attribute values
> http://www.w3.org/TR/ssml-sayas
>
> 1998-01-28
> Voice Browsers
> http://www.w3.org/TR/NOTE-voice
>
>
> Working Drafts:
> -------------
> 2010-12-16
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 3.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml30/
>
>
> I would personally like to thank all the members of the Voice Browser
> Working Group over the years, with special mention to
> - Jim Barnett and his team for helping us finish SCXML, our final
> Recommendation,
> - Kaz Ashimura for his years of dedicated work as our Team Contact,
> and
> - Jim Larson and our recently departed friend, Scott McGlashan, for their
outstanding vision and leadership.
>
> Thank you.
>
>
> Dan Burnett
> Chair, Voice Browser Working Group
>









--
Kaz Ashimura, W3C Staff Contact for Auto, WoT, TV, MMI, Voice and Geo
Tel: +81 3 3516 2504


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Re: ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close REUNION?

Kazuyuki Ashimura
On Tue, Sep 29, 2015 at 11:08 PM, Jim Larson <[hidden email]> wrote:
Kazuyuki,

I think this is a great idea, would you be willing to build a public mailing list?

Please let me check within the Team.

Kazuyuki

 

Regards,

-Jim


On 9/28/2015 9:17 PM, Kazuyuki Ashimura wrote:
Hi Dan, Jim Larson, Jim Barnett, Debbie and all,

I really appreciate all the great contribution made by the group
to the standardization of voice technologies, and am proud that
I could be a part of the work.

By the way, as you know, the group is closing, and that means
the VBWG mailing lists (both the Member list and the public list)
will be also closed.

So I think maybe it would make sense to have another ML for
the VBWG alumni to continue some more discussion, e.g, on
the possible reunion at SpeechTEK.

What d you think?

Maybe the ML could be a public one.

Thanks,

Kazuyuki



On Tue, Sep 29, 2015 at 3:00 AM, Deborah Dahl <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear Dan,
Thank you for your note and the summary of the VBWG's history and
specifications. The list of specifications that the group published is
indeed impressive, but it's even more impressive when you know, as the VBWG
members well know, how each feature of each specification was thought
through, debated, revised, wordsmithed, and tested before it became part of
the standard. The specifications look on the surface like a dry list of
MUST's and SHOULD's but that appearance doesn't do justice to the long
discussions and late nights in far-flung places that led to their creation.
All of this hard work and care resulted in an incredible suite of standards
that laid the foundation for a whole industry. I only wish Scott were still
with us today to share these final thoughts.
Jim, that's a wonderful idea to get together at SpeechTEK. I would love to
do that.
best,
Debbie

-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Larson [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, September 28, 2015 11:24 AM
To: Dan Burnett; [hidden email] (group); Voice Public List
Subject: Re: ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close REUNION?

Thanks so much for participating in one of the most successful W3C working
groups.  We achieved much, had meetings at interesting places, and had great
times.  Thank you.

Let me know if you would like to get together for a WBWG reunion at
SpeechTEK, May 23-25 in Washington DC, by indicating your availability at
one or more of these dates/times:

Sunday evening May 22
Monday lunch May 23
Monday evening May 23
Tuesday lunch May 24
Tuesday evening May 24
Wednesday lunch May 25
Wednesday evening May 25

-Jim



On 9/26/2015 8:26 AM, Dan Burnett wrote:
> To all of you who have helped in the Voice Browser Working Group over
> the years,
>
>
> The Voice Browser Working Group will be closing shortly, but before it
does, it is appropriate to say a few words about the history and
accomplishments of the WG.
>
> The Voice Browser Working Group has been one of the longest-running and
most successful working groups at W3C, both in terms of its list of
specifications and its whole-hearted adoption by its target industry.
>
> Under the leadership of Jim Larson, the group started in 1999 with a goal
of taking the VoiceXML 1.0 specification created by IBM, Motorola, AT&T, and
Lucent and turning it into a world-wide standard for call center Interactive
Voice Response (IVR) application development.  At the time, nearly all such
development was done using proprietary software running on custom hardware
systems that lived in phone company Central Office buildings.  Application
development took many months, and new features often took years to make
their way onto the hardware platforms.  Additionally, Automatic Speech
Recognition (ASR, or Voice Recognition) technology suffered from a lack of
adopted standards, even though many of the APIs were similar at their core
due to agreements in the research community.  This made it difficult for
competition in the ASR space to flourish since each ASR engine had a custom
API that IVR application developers had to use.  Meanwhile, the HTML
revolution had already resulted in web-based customer self-care, so
enterprises already had a direct line between their customers and their back
end systems.
> Enter VoiceXML.  Extending XML in the way W3C, at the time, was extending
HTML, via XML elements with associated rendering semantics, VoiceXML created
a uniform language for IVR development that allowed enterprises to use the
web model of resource naming, caching, and fetching for easy integration
with their existing back-end systems.  Simultaneously, it created a uniform
way to use ASR engines, with a common lexical grammar language (SRGS), a
common semantic processor language (SISR), a common speech synthesis
language (SSML), a common lexicon format (PLS), and the amazing innovation
of a confidence threshold value constrained to range from 0 to 100,
something considered almost impossible at the time.
> Most importantly, VoiceXML introduced the web model to the automated call
center environment, along with its associated reductions in development cost
and time and deployment cost and time. Within a few short years
VoiceXML-based systems dominated the IVR industry, replacing all existing
custom hardware systems on the market with racks of general compute servers
as we know them today.
> VoiceXML has been an unqualified success that has directly led to
continued innovations such as those from the cloud IVR industry of Twilio,
Tropo, and others.
>
> During its lifetime the Voice Browser produced the following
specifications:
>
> Recommendations:
> ----------------
> 2015-09-01
> State Chart XML (SCXML): State Machine Notation for Control
> Abstraction http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml/
>
> 2011-07-05
> Voice Browser Call Control: CCXML Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/ccxml/
>
> 2010-09-07
> Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.1
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis11/
>
> 2008-10-14
> Pronunciation Lexicon Specification (PLS) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/pronunciation-lexicon/
>
> 2007-06-19
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 2.1
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml21/
>
> 2007-04-05
> Semantic Interpretation for Speech Recognition (SISR) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/semantic-interpretation/
>
> 2004-09-07
> Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis
>
> 2004-03-16
> Speech Recognition Grammar Specification Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-grammar
>
> 2004-03-16
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) Version 2.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml20
>
> Group Notes:
> ------------
> 2015-08-11
> DOM Event I/O Processor for SCXML
> http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-dom-iop/
>
> 2015-08-11
> XPath Data Model for SCXML
> http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-xpath-dm/
>
> 2009-12-08
> Mobile Web for Social Development Roadmap
> http://www.w3.org/TR/mw4d-roadmap/
>
> 2005-05-26
> SSML 1.0 say-as attribute values
> http://www.w3.org/TR/ssml-sayas
>
> 1998-01-28
> Voice Browsers
> http://www.w3.org/TR/NOTE-voice
>
>
> Working Drafts:
> -------------
> 2010-12-16
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 3.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml30/
>
>
> I would personally like to thank all the members of the Voice Browser
> Working Group over the years, with special mention to
> - Jim Barnett and his team for helping us finish SCXML, our final
> Recommendation,
> - Kaz Ashimura for his years of dedicated work as our Team Contact,
> and
> - Jim Larson and our recently departed friend, Scott McGlashan, for their
outstanding vision and leadership.
>
> Thank you.
>
>
> Dan Burnett
> Chair, Voice Browser Working Group
>









--
Kaz Ashimura, W3C Staff Contact for Auto, WoT, TV, MMI, Voice and Geo
Tel: <a href="tel:%2B81%203%203516%202504" value="+81335162504" target="_blank">+81 3 3516 2504





--
Kaz Ashimura, W3C Staff Contact for Auto, WoT, TV, MMI, Voice and Geo
Tel: +81 3 3516 2504

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RE: ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close REUNION?

Michael Bodell-2

It would be good to keep the public list up too, since people ask questions about recommendations on the list from time to time.  The recommendations say things like: “Comments for this specification are welcomed to [hidden email] (archives).”

 

From: Kazuyuki Ashimura [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, September 29, 2015 7:20 AM
To: Jim Larson
Cc: Deborah Dahl; Jim Barnett; James Larson; [hidden email]; Voice Public List
Subject: Re: ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close REUNION?

 

On Tue, Sep 29, 2015 at 11:08 PM, Jim Larson <[hidden email]> wrote:

Kazuyuki,

I think this is a great idea, would you be willing to build a public mailing list?

 

Please let me check within the Team.

 

Kazuyuki

 

 


Regards,

-Jim



On 9/28/2015 9:17 PM, Kazuyuki Ashimura wrote:

Hi Dan, Jim Larson, Jim Barnett, Debbie and all,

 

I really appreciate all the great contribution made by the group

to the standardization of voice technologies, and am proud that

I could be a part of the work.

 

By the way, as you know, the group is closing, and that means

the VBWG mailing lists (both the Member list and the public list)

will be also closed.

 

So I think maybe it would make sense to have another ML for

the VBWG alumni to continue some more discussion, e.g, on

the possible reunion at SpeechTEK.

 

What d you think?

 

Maybe the ML could be a public one.

 

Thanks,

 

Kazuyuki

 

 

 

On Tue, Sep 29, 2015 at 3:00 AM, Deborah Dahl <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Dan,
Thank you for your note and the summary of the VBWG's history and
specifications. The list of specifications that the group published is
indeed impressive, but it's even more impressive when you know, as the VBWG
members well know, how each feature of each specification was thought
through, debated, revised, wordsmithed, and tested before it became part of
the standard. The specifications look on the surface like a dry list of
MUST's and SHOULD's but that appearance doesn't do justice to the long
discussions and late nights in far-flung places that led to their creation.
All of this hard work and care resulted in an incredible suite of standards
that laid the foundation for a whole industry. I only wish Scott were still
with us today to share these final thoughts.
Jim, that's a wonderful idea to get together at SpeechTEK. I would love to
do that.
best,
Debbie

-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Larson [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, September 28, 2015 11:24 AM
To: Dan Burnett; [hidden email] (group); Voice Public List
Subject: Re: ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close REUNION?

Thanks so much for participating in one of the most successful W3C working
groups.  We achieved much, had meetings at interesting places, and had great
times.  Thank you.

Let me know if you would like to get together for a WBWG reunion at
SpeechTEK, May 23-25 in Washington DC, by indicating your availability at
one or more of these dates/times:

Sunday evening May 22
Monday lunch May 23
Monday evening May 23
Tuesday lunch May 24
Tuesday evening May 24
Wednesday lunch May 25
Wednesday evening May 25

-Jim



On 9/26/2015 8:26 AM, Dan Burnett wrote:
> To all of you who have helped in the Voice Browser Working Group over
> the years,
>
>
> The Voice Browser Working Group will be closing shortly, but before it
does, it is appropriate to say a few words about the history and
accomplishments of the WG.
>
> The Voice Browser Working Group has been one of the longest-running and
most successful working groups at W3C, both in terms of its list of
specifications and its whole-hearted adoption by its target industry.
>
> Under the leadership of Jim Larson, the group started in 1999 with a goal
of taking the VoiceXML 1.0 specification created by IBM, Motorola, AT&T, and
Lucent and turning it into a world-wide standard for call center Interactive
Voice Response (IVR) application development.  At the time, nearly all such
development was done using proprietary software running on custom hardware
systems that lived in phone company Central Office buildings.  Application
development took many months, and new features often took years to make
their way onto the hardware platforms.  Additionally, Automatic Speech
Recognition (ASR, or Voice Recognition) technology suffered from a lack of
adopted standards, even though many of the APIs were similar at their core
due to agreements in the research community.  This made it difficult for
competition in the ASR space to flourish since each ASR engine had a custom
API that IVR application developers had to use.  Meanwhile, the HTML
revolution had already resulted in web-based customer self-care, so
enterprises already had a direct line between their customers and their back
end systems.
> Enter VoiceXML.  Extending XML in the way W3C, at the time, was extending
HTML, via XML elements with associated rendering semantics, VoiceXML created
a uniform language for IVR development that allowed enterprises to use the
web model of resource naming, caching, and fetching for easy integration
with their existing back-end systems.  Simultaneously, it created a uniform
way to use ASR engines, with a common lexical grammar language (SRGS), a
common semantic processor language (SISR), a common speech synthesis
language (SSML), a common lexicon format (PLS), and the amazing innovation
of a confidence threshold value constrained to range from 0 to 100,
something considered almost impossible at the time.
> Most importantly, VoiceXML introduced the web model to the automated call
center environment, along with its associated reductions in development cost
and time and deployment cost and time. Within a few short years
VoiceXML-based systems dominated the IVR industry, replacing all existing
custom hardware systems on the market with racks of general compute servers
as we know them today.
> VoiceXML has been an unqualified success that has directly led to
continued innovations such as those from the cloud IVR industry of Twilio,
Tropo, and others.
>
> During its lifetime the Voice Browser produced the following
specifications:
>
> Recommendations:
> ----------------
> 2015-09-01
> State Chart XML (SCXML): State Machine Notation for Control
> Abstraction http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml/
>
> 2011-07-05
> Voice Browser Call Control: CCXML Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/ccxml/
>
> 2010-09-07
> Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.1
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis11/
>
> 2008-10-14
> Pronunciation Lexicon Specification (PLS) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/pronunciation-lexicon/
>
> 2007-06-19
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 2.1
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml21/
>
> 2007-04-05
> Semantic Interpretation for Speech Recognition (SISR) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/semantic-interpretation/
>
> 2004-09-07
> Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis
>
> 2004-03-16
> Speech Recognition Grammar Specification Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-grammar
>
> 2004-03-16
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) Version 2.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml20
>
> Group Notes:
> ------------
> 2015-08-11
> DOM Event I/O Processor for SCXML
> http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-dom-iop/
>
> 2015-08-11
> XPath Data Model for SCXML
> http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-xpath-dm/
>
> 2009-12-08
> Mobile Web for Social Development Roadmap
> http://www.w3.org/TR/mw4d-roadmap/
>
> 2005-05-26
> SSML 1.0 say-as attribute values
> http://www.w3.org/TR/ssml-sayas
>
> 1998-01-28
> Voice Browsers
> http://www.w3.org/TR/NOTE-voice
>
>
> Working Drafts:
> -------------
> 2010-12-16
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 3.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml30/
>
>
> I would personally like to thank all the members of the Voice Browser
> Working Group over the years, with special mention to
> - Jim Barnett and his team for helping us finish SCXML, our final
> Recommendation,
> - Kaz Ashimura for his years of dedicated work as our Team Contact,
> and
> - Jim Larson and our recently departed friend, Scott McGlashan, for their
outstanding vision and leadership.
>
> Thank you.
>
>
> Dan Burnett
> Chair, Voice Browser Working Group
>







 

--

Kaz Ashimura, W3C Staff Contact for Auto, WoT, TV, MMI, Voice and Geo

Tel: <a href="tel:%2B81%203%203516%202504" target="_blank">+81 3 3516 2504

 

 



 

--

Kaz Ashimura, W3C Staff Contact for Auto, WoT, TV, MMI, Voice and Geo

Tel: +81 3 3516 2504

 

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Re: ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close

Jerry Carter
In reply to this post by Dan Burnett-3
This is terrific news!  The VBWG has made significant contributions to the IVR and call center markets.  Jim Larson, Scott McGlashan, Dan Burnett, and the many members of the group over the years are to be commended for their efforts in standardizing the technology and promoting the widespread adoption of speech applications.  The impact has literally changed an industry.  At the same time, the technology has continued to move forward at a rapid pace.  It is interesting to reread the original charter of the working group which focused on bringing speech into HTML and to then compare those early objectives against what is now possible.  It’s been an interesting journey and the VBWG has had a significant role in removing roadblocks and speeding the trip.

Thanks again to the chairs of the group and the many members for their efforts and for many fruitful and educational discussions.

-=- Jerry


On Sat, 26 Sep 2015 11:26:24, Dan Burnett wrote:

> To all of you who have helped in the Voice Browser Working Group over the years,
>
>
> The Voice Browser Working Group will be closing shortly, but before it does, it is appropriate to say a few words about the history and accomplishments of the WG.
>
> The Voice Browser Working Group has been one of the longest-running and most successful working groups at W3C, both in terms of its list of specifications and its whole-hearted adoption by its target industry.
>
> Under the leadership of Jim Larson, the group started in 1999 with a goal of taking the VoiceXML 1.0 specification created by IBM, Motorola, AT&T, and Lucent and turning it into a world-wide standard for call center Interactive Voice Response (IVR) application development.  At the time, nearly all such development was done using proprietary software running on custom hardware systems that lived in phone company Central Office buildings.  Application development took many months, and new features often took years to make their way onto the hardware platforms.  Additionally, Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR, or Voice Recognition) technology suffered from a lack of adopted standards, even though many of the APIs were similar at their core due to agreements in the research community.  This made it difficult for competition in the ASR space to flourish since each ASR engine had a custom API that IVR application developers had to use.  Meanwhile, the HTML revolution had already resulted in web-based customer self-care, so enterprises already had a direct line between their customers and their back end systems.
> Enter VoiceXML.  Extending XML in the way W3C, at the time, was extending HTML, via XML elements with associated rendering semantics, VoiceXML created a uniform language for IVR development that allowed enterprises to use the web model of resource naming, caching, and fetching for easy integration with their existing back-end systems.  Simultaneously, it created a uniform way to use ASR engines, with a common lexical grammar language (SRGS), a common semantic processor language (SISR), a common speech synthesis language (SSML), a common lexicon format (PLS), and the amazing innovation of a confidence threshold value constrained to range from 0 to 100, something considered almost impossible at the time.
> Most importantly, VoiceXML introduced the web model to the automated call center environment, along with its associated reductions in development cost and time and deployment cost and time. Within a few short years VoiceXML-based systems dominated the IVR industry, replacing all existing custom hardware systems on the market with racks of general compute servers as we know them today.
> VoiceXML has been an unqualified success that has directly led to continued innovations such as those from the cloud IVR industry of Twilio, Tropo, and others.



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Re: ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close REUNION?

Dan Burnett-3
In reply to this post by Michael Bodell-2
<base href="x-msg://393/">Yes, I agree with both of these suggestions as well.  Even if the www-voice list remains only as a forward to a generic W3C list, it would be good for the alias to remain if possible.

And an alumni list sounds fun :)

-- dan

On Sep 29, 2015, at 1:22 PM, Michael Bodell wrote:

It would be good to keep the public list up too, since people ask questions about recommendations on the list from time to time.  The recommendations say things like: “Comments for this specification are welcomed to [hidden email] (archives).”
 
From: Kazuyuki Ashimura [mailto:[hidden email]] 
Sent: Tuesday, September 29, 2015 7:20 AM
To: Jim Larson
Cc: Deborah Dahl; Jim Barnett; James Larson; [hidden email]; Voice Public List
Subject: Re: ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close REUNION?
 
On Tue, Sep 29, 2015 at 11:08 PM, Jim Larson <[hidden email]> wrote:
Kazuyuki,

I think this is a great idea, would you be willing to build a public mailing list?
 
Please let me check within the Team.
 
Kazuyuki
 
 

Regards,

-Jim


On 9/28/2015 9:17 PM, Kazuyuki Ashimura wrote:
Hi Dan, Jim Larson, Jim Barnett, Debbie and all,
 
I really appreciate all the great contribution made by the group
to the standardization of voice technologies, and am proud that
I could be a part of the work.
 
By the way, as you know, the group is closing, and that means
the VBWG mailing lists (both the Member list and the public list)
will be also closed.
 
So I think maybe it would make sense to have another ML for
the VBWG alumni to continue some more discussion, e.g, on
the possible reunion at SpeechTEK.
 
What d you think?
 
Maybe the ML could be a public one.
 
Thanks,
 
Kazuyuki
 
 
 
On Tue, Sep 29, 2015 at 3:00 AM, Deborah Dahl <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Dan,
Thank you for your note and the summary of the VBWG's history and
specifications. The list of specifications that the group published is
indeed impressive, but it's even more impressive when you know, as the VBWG
members well know, how each feature of each specification was thought
through, debated, revised, wordsmithed, and tested before it became part of
the standard. The specifications look on the surface like a dry list of
MUST's and SHOULD's but that appearance doesn't do justice to the long
discussions and late nights in far-flung places that led to their creation.
All of this hard work and care resulted in an incredible suite of standards
that laid the foundation for a whole industry. I only wish Scott were still
with us today to share these final thoughts.
Jim, that's a wonderful idea to get together at SpeechTEK. I would love to
do that.
best,
Debbie

-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Larson [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, September 28, 2015 11:24 AM
To: Dan Burnett; [hidden email] (group); Voice Public List
Subject: Re: ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close REUNION?

Thanks so much for participating in one of the most successful W3C working
groups.  We achieved much, had meetings at interesting places, and had great
times.  Thank you.

Let me know if you would like to get together for a WBWG reunion at
SpeechTEK, May 23-25 in Washington DC, by indicating your availability at
one or more of these dates/times:

Sunday evening May 22
Monday lunch May 23
Monday evening May 23
Tuesday lunch May 24
Tuesday evening May 24
Wednesday lunch May 25
Wednesday evening May 25

-Jim



On 9/26/2015 8:26 AM, Dan Burnett wrote:
> To all of you who have helped in the Voice Browser Working Group over
> the years,
>
>
> The Voice Browser Working Group will be closing shortly, but before it
does, it is appropriate to say a few words about the history and
accomplishments of the WG.
>
> The Voice Browser Working Group has been one of the longest-running and
most successful working groups at W3C, both in terms of its list of
specifications and its whole-hearted adoption by its target industry.
>
> Under the leadership of Jim Larson, the group started in 1999 with a goal
of taking the VoiceXML 1.0 specification created by IBM, Motorola, AT&T, and
Lucent and turning it into a world-wide standard for call center Interactive
Voice Response (IVR) application development.  At the time, nearly all such
development was done using proprietary software running on custom hardware
systems that lived in phone company Central Office buildings.  Application
development took many months, and new features often took years to make
their way onto the hardware platforms.  Additionally, Automatic Speech
Recognition (ASR, or Voice Recognition) technology suffered from a lack of
adopted standards, even though many of the APIs were similar at their core
due to agreements in the research community.  This made it difficult for
competition in the ASR space to flourish since each ASR engine had a custom
API that IVR application developers had to use.  Meanwhile, the HTML
revolution had already resulted in web-based customer self-care, so
enterprises already had a direct line between their customers and their back
end systems.
> Enter VoiceXML.  Extending XML in the way W3C, at the time, was extending
HTML, via XML elements with associated rendering semantics, VoiceXML created
a uniform language for IVR development that allowed enterprises to use the
web model of resource naming, caching, and fetching for easy integration
with their existing back-end systems.  Simultaneously, it created a uniform
way to use ASR engines, with a common lexical grammar language (SRGS), a
common semantic processor language (SISR), a common speech synthesis
language (SSML), a common lexicon format (PLS), and the amazing innovation
of a confidence threshold value constrained to range from 0 to 100,
something considered almost impossible at the time.
> Most importantly, VoiceXML introduced the web model to the automated call
center environment, along with its associated reductions in development cost
and time and deployment cost and time. Within a few short years
VoiceXML-based systems dominated the IVR industry, replacing all existing
custom hardware systems on the market with racks of general compute servers
as we know them today.
> VoiceXML has been an unqualified success that has directly led to
continued innovations such as those from the cloud IVR industry of Twilio,
Tropo, and others.
>
> During its lifetime the Voice Browser produced the following
specifications:


>
> Recommendations:
> ----------------
> 2015-09-01
> State Chart XML (SCXML): State Machine Notation for Control
> Abstraction http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml/
>
> 2011-07-05
> Voice Browser Call Control: CCXML Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/ccxml/
>
> 2010-09-07
> Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.1
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis11/
>
> 2008-10-14
> Pronunciation Lexicon Specification (PLS) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/pronunciation-lexicon/
>
> 2007-06-19
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 2.1
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml21/
>
> 2007-04-05
> Semantic Interpretation for Speech Recognition (SISR) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/semantic-interpretation/
>
> 2004-09-07
> Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis
>
> 2004-03-16
> Speech Recognition Grammar Specification Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-grammar
>
> 2004-03-16
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) Version 2.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml20
>
> Group Notes:
> ------------
> 2015-08-11
> DOM Event I/O Processor for SCXML
> http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-dom-iop/
>
> 2015-08-11
> XPath Data Model for SCXML
> http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-xpath-dm/
>
> 2009-12-08
> Mobile Web for Social Development Roadmap
> http://www.w3.org/TR/mw4d-roadmap/
>
> 2005-05-26
> SSML 1.0 say-as attribute values
> http://www.w3.org/TR/ssml-sayas
>
> 1998-01-28
> Voice Browsers
> http://www.w3.org/TR/NOTE-voice
>
>
> Working Drafts:
> -------------
> 2010-12-16
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 3.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml30/
>
>
> I would personally like to thank all the members of the Voice Browser
> Working Group over the years, with special mention to
> - Jim Barnett and his team for helping us finish SCXML, our final
> Recommendation,
> - Kaz Ashimura for his years of dedicated work as our Team Contact,
> and
> - Jim Larson and our recently departed friend, Scott McGlashan, for their
outstanding vision and leadership.
>
> Thank you.
>
>
> Dan Burnett
> Chair, Voice Browser Working Group
>







 
--
Kaz Ashimura, W3C Staff Contact for Auto, WoT, TV, MMI, Voice and Geo
Tel: <a href="tel:%2B81%203%203516%202504" target="_blank" style="color: blue; text-decoration: underline; ">+81 3 3516 2504
 
 


 
--
Kaz Ashimura, W3C Staff Contact for Auto, WoT, TV, MMI, Voice and Geo
Tel: +81 3 3516 2504
 

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Re: ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close REUNION?

Kazuyuki Ashimura
On Wed, Sep 30, 2015 at 11:54 PM, Dan Burnett <[hidden email]> wrote:
Yes, I agree with both of these suggestions as well.  Even if the www-voice list remains only as a forward to a generic W3C list, it would be good for the alias to remain if possible.

I talked within the W3C Team and got confirmation that we can keep
the www-voice list open after closing the group :)

Kazuyuki


And an alumni list sounds fun :)

-- dan

On Sep 29, 2015, at 1:22 PM, Michael Bodell wrote:

It would be good to keep the public list up too, since people ask questions about recommendations on the list from time to time.  The recommendations say things like: “Comments for this specification are welcomed to [hidden email] (archives).”
 
From: Kazuyuki Ashimura [mailto:[hidden email]] 
Sent: Tuesday, September 29, 2015 7:20 AM
To: Jim Larson
Cc: Deborah Dahl; Jim Barnett; James Larson; [hidden email]; Voice Public List
Subject: Re: ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close REUNION?
 
On Tue, Sep 29, 2015 at 11:08 PM, Jim Larson <[hidden email]> wrote:
Kazuyuki,

I think this is a great idea, would you be willing to build a public mailing list?
 
Please let me check within the Team.
 
Kazuyuki
 
 

Regards,

-Jim


On 9/28/2015 9:17 PM, Kazuyuki Ashimura wrote:
Hi Dan, Jim Larson, Jim Barnett, Debbie and all,
 
I really appreciate all the great contribution made by the group
to the standardization of voice technologies, and am proud that
I could be a part of the work.
 
By the way, as you know, the group is closing, and that means
the VBWG mailing lists (both the Member list and the public list)
will be also closed.
 
So I think maybe it would make sense to have another ML for
the VBWG alumni to continue some more discussion, e.g, on
the possible reunion at SpeechTEK.
 
What d you think?
 
Maybe the ML could be a public one.
 
Thanks,
 
Kazuyuki
 
 
 
On Tue, Sep 29, 2015 at 3:00 AM, Deborah Dahl <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Dan,
Thank you for your note and the summary of the VBWG's history and
specifications. The list of specifications that the group published is
indeed impressive, but it's even more impressive when you know, as the VBWG
members well know, how each feature of each specification was thought
through, debated, revised, wordsmithed, and tested before it became part of
the standard. The specifications look on the surface like a dry list of
MUST's and SHOULD's but that appearance doesn't do justice to the long
discussions and late nights in far-flung places that led to their creation.
All of this hard work and care resulted in an incredible suite of standards
that laid the foundation for a whole industry. I only wish Scott were still
with us today to share these final thoughts.
Jim, that's a wonderful idea to get together at SpeechTEK. I would love to
do that.
best,
Debbie

-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Larson [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, September 28, 2015 11:24 AM
To: Dan Burnett; [hidden email] (group); Voice Public List
Subject: Re: ALL: Thoughts and thanks as the VBWG comes to a close REUNION?

Thanks so much for participating in one of the most successful W3C working
groups.  We achieved much, had meetings at interesting places, and had great
times.  Thank you.

Let me know if you would like to get together for a WBWG reunion at
SpeechTEK, May 23-25 in Washington DC, by indicating your availability at
one or more of these dates/times:

Sunday evening May 22
Monday lunch May 23
Monday evening May 23
Tuesday lunch May 24
Tuesday evening May 24
Wednesday lunch May 25
Wednesday evening May 25

-Jim



On 9/26/2015 8:26 AM, Dan Burnett wrote:
> To all of you who have helped in the Voice Browser Working Group over
> the years,
>
>
> The Voice Browser Working Group will be closing shortly, but before it
does, it is appropriate to say a few words about the history and
accomplishments of the WG.
>
> The Voice Browser Working Group has been one of the longest-running and
most successful working groups at W3C, both in terms of its list of
specifications and its whole-hearted adoption by its target industry.
>
> Under the leadership of Jim Larson, the group started in 1999 with a goal
of taking the VoiceXML 1.0 specification created by IBM, Motorola, AT&T, and
Lucent and turning it into a world-wide standard for call center Interactive
Voice Response (IVR) application development.  At the time, nearly all such
development was done using proprietary software running on custom hardware
systems that lived in phone company Central Office buildings.  Application
development took many months, and new features often took years to make
their way onto the hardware platforms.  Additionally, Automatic Speech
Recognition (ASR, or Voice Recognition) technology suffered from a lack of
adopted standards, even though many of the APIs were similar at their core
due to agreements in the research community.  This made it difficult for
competition in the ASR space to flourish since each ASR engine had a custom
API that IVR application developers had to use.  Meanwhile, the HTML
revolution had already resulted in web-based customer self-care, so
enterprises already had a direct line between their customers and their back
end systems.
> Enter VoiceXML.  Extending XML in the way W3C, at the time, was extending
HTML, via XML elements with associated rendering semantics, VoiceXML created
a uniform language for IVR development that allowed enterprises to use the
web model of resource naming, caching, and fetching for easy integration
with their existing back-end systems.  Simultaneously, it created a uniform
way to use ASR engines, with a common lexical grammar language (SRGS), a
common semantic processor language (SISR), a common speech synthesis
language (SSML), a common lexicon format (PLS), and the amazing innovation
of a confidence threshold value constrained to range from 0 to 100,
something considered almost impossible at the time.
> Most importantly, VoiceXML introduced the web model to the automated call
center environment, along with its associated reductions in development cost
and time and deployment cost and time. Within a few short years
VoiceXML-based systems dominated the IVR industry, replacing all existing
custom hardware systems on the market with racks of general compute servers
as we know them today.
> VoiceXML has been an unqualified success that has directly led to
continued innovations such as those from the cloud IVR industry of Twilio,
Tropo, and others.
>
> During its lifetime the Voice Browser produced the following
specifications:


>
> Recommendations:
> ----------------
> 2015-09-01
> State Chart XML (SCXML): State Machine Notation for Control
> Abstraction http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml/
>
> 2011-07-05
> Voice Browser Call Control: CCXML Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/ccxml/
>
> 2010-09-07
> Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.1
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis11/
>
> 2008-10-14
> Pronunciation Lexicon Specification (PLS) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/pronunciation-lexicon/
>
> 2007-06-19
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 2.1
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml21/
>
> 2007-04-05
> Semantic Interpretation for Speech Recognition (SISR) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/semantic-interpretation/
>
> 2004-09-07
> Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-synthesis
>
> 2004-03-16
> Speech Recognition Grammar Specification Version 1.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/speech-grammar
>
> 2004-03-16
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) Version 2.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml20
>
> Group Notes:
> ------------
> 2015-08-11
> DOM Event I/O Processor for SCXML
> http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-dom-iop/
>
> 2015-08-11
> XPath Data Model for SCXML
> http://www.w3.org/TR/scxml-xpath-dm/
>
> 2009-12-08
> Mobile Web for Social Development Roadmap
> http://www.w3.org/TR/mw4d-roadmap/
>
> 2005-05-26
> SSML 1.0 say-as attribute values
> http://www.w3.org/TR/ssml-sayas
>
> 1998-01-28
> Voice Browsers
> http://www.w3.org/TR/NOTE-voice
>
>
> Working Drafts:
> -------------
> 2010-12-16
> Voice Extensible Markup Language (VoiceXML) 3.0
> http://www.w3.org/TR/voicexml30/
>
>
> I would personally like to thank all the members of the Voice Browser
> Working Group over the years, with special mention to
> - Jim Barnett and his team for helping us finish SCXML, our final
> Recommendation,
> - Kaz Ashimura for his years of dedicated work as our Team Contact,
> and
> - Jim Larson and our recently departed friend, Scott McGlashan, for their
outstanding vision and leadership.
>
> Thank you.
>
>
> Dan Burnett
> Chair, Voice Browser Working Group
>







 
--
Kaz Ashimura, W3C Staff Contact for Auto, WoT, TV, MMI, Voice and Geo
Tel: <a href="tel:%2B81%203%203516%202504" style="color:blue;text-decoration:underline" target="_blank">+81 3 3516 2504
 
 


 
--
Kaz Ashimura, W3C Staff Contact for Auto, WoT, TV, MMI, Voice and Geo
Tel: <a href="tel:%2B81%203%203516%202504" value="+81335162504" target="_blank">+81 3 3516 2504
 




--
Kaz Ashimura, W3C Staff Contact for Auto, WoT, TV, MMI, Voice and Geo
Tel: +81 3 3516 2504